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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league and American association of professional base ball clubs"

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.1898.:'" - 



CONSTITUTION 



AND 



PLAYING RULES 



OF THE 



RATIONAL LEAGUE 



AND 



AMERICAN jOrSSOCIATION 



OF 



Professional Base Ball Clcjps. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION. 



Published by A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 
Niw Fork &nd i 



CONSTITUTION 

OF 'I HI' 

National League and American Association 

OF 

Professional Base Ball dubs. 
J 898. 



NAME. 

Section i. (i) This Association shall be called the NATIONAL 
League and American Association op Professional Base 
Ball Clubs. 

objects. 

Sec. 2. The objects of this League are : 

(i) To perpetuate base ball as the National game of the 
Uriited Slates, and to surround it with such safeguards as to 
warrant absolute public confidence in its integrity and methods. 

(2) To protect and promote the mutual interests of profes- 
sional base: hall clubs and professional base ball players, and 

(3) To establish and regulate the professional base ball 

championship of the United States. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Sec. 3. This League shall consist of twelve clubs (the mem- 
bership of which shall not be increased or diminished foraperiod 
of ten yens) located in the following named cities, to wit : 
Boston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Wash- 
ington, Pittsburg, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Louisville, Cleveland 
and Chicago ; or such other clubs as may, from time to ti mi 
elected to membership, as may be hereinafter provided for; bill 
in tin event shall there be more than <>//,■ club in any city. 
WITHDRAWAL prom membership. 

SEC. 4. Any club member of this League finding itself unable 
to meet the obligations it has assumed, shall have the right to 
ask the Leagui 1 ni permission to dispose of its rights and 
franchises, as a member of the League, to some other city or 



4 CONSTITUTION. 

organization. In the event of this League giving its consent 
to the acceptance of such city or organization to membership, 
providing said club shall assume, together with the rights and 
franchises of said retiring clul>, all the liabilities, responsibili- 
ties and obligations entered into by said retiring club, as a 
member of this League. Provided, also, and it must be so 
understood by the retiring and the new member, that the 
retiring club shall not be relieved or released from any con- 
tracts, responsibilities or obligations, entered into by it to this 
League, until all of said contracts, responsibilities and obliga- 
tions have been fully paid and determined by the club accept- 
ing its membership, rights, franchises, etc. 

ADMISSION TO MEMBERSHIP. 

Sf.c. 5. No club shall be admitted to membership unless it 
shall first have delivered to the Secretary of the League a 
written application signed by its President and Secretary, and 
accompanied by documents showing that such club bears the 
name of the city in which it is located, and that it is regularly 
organized and officered, and, where the State law permits it, 
chartered. Such application shall at once be transmitted by 
the Secretary to the Board of Directors, who shall immediately 
investigate and report upon said application, said report to be 
communicated to the League through the Secretary. 

Sec. 6. The voting upon an application for membership 
shall be by ballot, a three-fourths vote being requisite for 
election. 

IN REGARD TO VACANCIES. 

Sec 7. In case a vacancy occurs in the membership of this 
organization during the championship season, the President 
shall nominate to all the clubs all applicants for membership ; 
and the vote thereon may be taken by telegraph or mail, as 
occasion may require, and a majority of all the clubs will be 
required to admit any applicant to membership. Such mem- 
bership, however, shall continue only until the next annual 
meeting, but such club shall be subject to all the rules and 
requirements of this organization. 

TERMINATION OK MEMBERSHIP. 

Six. 8. The membership of any club may be terminated— 

(1) liy resignation duly accepted by a three-fourths vote of 
all the clubs in meeting duly convened, as provided in Section j 

(2) By failure to present its nine at the time and place at-re. d 
upon to play any championship game, unless caused by UnavnM 
able accident in traveling. ' ""•"»«*- 



CONSTITUTION. 5 

(3) Tty allowing open betting or pool selling upon its grounds 
or iii any building ou 1 1 ipied by it. 

(4) By playing any g ! ol ball with a club thai is disquali- 
fied or ineligible under this Constitution. 

(5) By offering, agreeing, conspirin mpting to 
.inn' of ball ; or (ailing to imn i xpel any player 

who shall be proven guilty of offering, agreeing, conspirin 
attempting to lose any game of ball, or of being interested in 
any pool or wager thereon. 

(6) By disbandment of its organization or club team during 
the championship season. 

(7) l!y failing or refusing to fulfill its contractual obligations. 
By failing or refusing to comply with any lawful require- 
ment of the Hoard of Directors. 

(9) By wilfully violating any p of this Constitution, 

legislation or playing rules made in pursuance thereof, or 
any violation of the provisions of the National Agreement. 

•I HE EXPULSION 

SEC. 9. To carry into effect the provisions of Section 8 of 
this Constitution, the facts in any case covered by such section 
must be reported to the Secretary of the League, who shall at 
once notify, by mail or telegraph, the patty charged with the 
specified default or offense and inquire whether any dispute 
exists as to the facts alleged. In case the facts are disp 
the Hoard shall, after doe notice, try the case under such reg- 
ulations as they may prescribe ; ami their finding shall be final 
and conclusive on all parlies except in case of expulsion, when 
such finding shall be forwarded to each club, which shall 
transmit to the Secretary written ballots " For Expulsion " or 
"Against Expulsion" ; and if all clubs vote " For Expulsion" 
the Secretary shall notify all clubs of the forfeiture of member- 
ship of the party charged. 

LENTS. 

Sec. 10. (1) Each club shall pay to the Secretary, on or 
before the first day of April of each year, the sum 
annual dues ; and such other sums as from time to time may l>e 
assjssed for the payment of salaries of officers and umpires, and 
for such other expenses as may be incurred by order of this 
League or the Board of Directors. Also all fines and penalties 

Imposed by said League or its Hoard ol Directors upon a club 

or upon any club officer, player, manager, scorer, or other em- 
ploye when so levied and imposed by virtue of, and in accord- 
ance with, the provisions of this Constitution and the playing 
rules of this League. 



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CONSTITUTION. 



THE IMPOSING OP FINES. 

(2) Upon conviction of any of the offenses prescribed in Sec- 
tion 8, as causes for expulsion, the Board of Directors may, in 
the first instance, as a preliminary to, or in lien of expulsion, 
impose such a fine as is in their judgment commensurate with 
the injury ; which fine may include a penalty payable to any 
other club or clubs, as an equivalent for damages sustained for 
such violation of this Constitution, or of the legislation or con- 
tracts made in pursuance thereof. 

OFFICERS. 

Sec. ii. At its annual meeting the League shall elect a 
President-Secretary-Treasurer and Board of Directors. The 
President shall be ex-officio Chairman of the Hoard of Directors. 
He shall report to the Board of Directors any violation of tin- 
provisions of this Constitution that may come to his knowledge. 
He shall be the sole interpreter of the flaying rulis (luring the 
championship season. lie shall preside at all the meetings of 
the League, and at the annual meeting of the League shall act 
as a schedule committee. 

Should the olfice of President become vacant by death, resig- 
nation, or removal, the Hoard of Directors shall, within thirty 
days thereafter, elect a President. 

Sec. 12. The Board of Directors shall consist of the Presi- 
dent and six other members, to be chosen at the annual meeting 
by lot, three of whom shall represent the Eastern clubs and 
three the Western clubs. 

QUALIFICATION'S OF OFFICERS. 

Sec. 13. No person shall be qualified to act as Director who 
is not an actual member of the club he represents ; nor shall 
any club, under any circumstances, be represented by more 
than one person on the Hoard of Directors. 

DUTIES OF HIE BOARD OF DIRECTORS. 

Sf.c. 14. The Board shall have the general supervision and 
management of all affairs and business of the League, and 
shall be individually answerable to the League for the faithful 
discharge of their trust. 

Sec. 15. The Hoard shall meet annually on the morning of 

the second Tuesday in December, at 12 o'l loi 1 on, at the 

place where the annual meeting of the League is to be held, 
but may hold special meetings whenever urgent necessity may 
require. 

Sec. if>. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of all 
their doings, and presi i.t the same in writing to the League al 
ils annual meeting; which report shall, if accepted, be filed 



CONSTITUTION. 



with llie Secretary; together with all official papers, docu- 
ments and property, which may have come into their possession 
by virtue of their office. 

VACANCY IN THB B0H.RO. 

SEC. 17. In case of vacancy in the Board by reason of the 
death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any Director, 
the club of which he was a member, at the time he was chosen, 
shall designate his successor, and at once notify the Secretary. 
But if such vacancy is caused by the withdrawal, disbanding, 
or disqualification of a club represented on the Board, the 
Board may fill the vacancy by election in the same manner as 
provided for the election of Directors in Section 12. 
THE SECRETARY'S I" 

SEC. 18. The Secretary shall be the Trcasurerof the League, 
and as such shall be the custodian of all funds of the League ; 
'v all dues, fees and assessments; make such payments, 
as shall be ordered by the Board or by the vote of the League, 
and render annually a report of his accounts ; and he shall 
give such bond, with approved sureties, as the Board may 
require. 

Sic. 19. The Secretary shall have the custody and care of 
the official records ami papers of the League ; shall keep a 
true record of all meetings of the League and the Board ; shall 
issue all official notices, and attend to the necessary corre- 
spondence ; he shall also prepare and furnish such reports as 
may be called for by the Board, and shall be entitled to such 
books, stationery, blanks and materials as the actual duties of 
his office may require. 

Sic. 20. The Secretary shall keep a record of all infractions 
of the rules and regulations of the League that may come under 
his notice, and shall make a report on the same to the Board at 
its next meeting. 

SEC, 21. The Secretary shall receive such salary as the Board, 
by vote, shall determine, and shall be reimbursed for all travel- 
ing expenses actually incurred by him in the service of the 
League ; and the Board may exact from him such guarantees 
for the faithful performance of his duties as they would deem 
for the interest and safety of the League. At the expiration of 
his term of office he shall account lor. and deliver up to the 
Board, all the property and papers which may have come into 
his hands by virtue of his ofi 

LAWS GOVERNING EMPLOYEES. 
IN1H\ iim'ai. CLUB CO 
Sec. 22. Each club belonging to this League shall have the 



CONSTITUTION. 



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right to regulate its own affairs ; to establish its own rules, and 
to discipline, punish, suspend or expel its own manager, play- 
ers or other employes, and these powers shall not be limited to 
casts of dishonest play or open insubordination ; but shall 
include all questions of carelessness, indifference or other con- 
duct of the player that may be regarded by the club as 
prejudicial to Its interests, and not in conflict with any provision 
of this Constitution ; or the playing rules of this League. The 
President of the League shall have power, upon proper proof, 
to inflict a line for any such offenses not exceeding $200, which 
fine can only be remitted by the Board of Directors. 

CLUB TERRITORIAL RIGHTS. 

Sec. 23. Every clur> of this League shall have exclusive 
control of the city in which it is located, ami of the territory 
surrounding such city, to the extent of five miles in every 
direction from its corporate limits ; and no visiting League club 
shall, under any circumstances — except with the consent of the 
local League club, until all League championship games on 
that ground shall have been finished — be allowed to play any 
club in such territory other than the League club therein 
located : nor shall a visiting League club play any game in 
April, with any non-League club, within said five miles from 
the corporate limits of the city in which the League club is 
located, without the consent of the local League club. 

MODE OK CONTRACT. 

SEC 24. Contracts made between a club and its players may 
be either by telegram or writing, to be followed within thirty 
days thereafter by a contract in the form approved and promul- 
gated by the Secretary to all the clubs of the League. 

ON RESERVATION OF PLAYERS. 

Sec. 25. Each club a member of this League shall be entitled 
to the right of reservation. On or before the 30th day of Sep- 
tember in each year each club shall transmit to the Secretary a 
reserve list of the players whose services it desires to retain, 
and who are then under contract to the said club for the current 
or for any succeeding season or seasons ; and in addition 
thereto the names of such players reserved in any prior annual 
list who have refused to contract with said club. Such players, 
together with all others thereafer to be regularly contracted 
with, shall be ineligible to contract with any other club in this 
League except as hereinafter provided. A'o cluli shall have the 
right to reserve any player when in arrears of salary to him. 
The Secretary shall promulgate such lists. 



CONSTITUTION. ') 

MAKING CONTRACTS. 
Si i . 26. The League sliall adopt such form of contract as it 
may deem best for the protection of the rights of the parlies 
thereto. All contracts must be approved by the Secretary, and 
duly promulgated by him. The ten days' release, provided for 
in the seventeenth paragraph of the League form of contract, 
shall begin to run from the time of notice thereof received by 
the Secretary of the League, who shall, at once, promulgate 
the same to all club members. At the expiration of said ten 
days the player, so released, shall be eligible to contract with 
the releasing club, or any other club member. 

EXPULSION OF PLAYERS, 
SEC. 27. Any player, while under contract with, or reserva- 
tion by, a League club, who shall, without the consent of such 
club, enter the service of any other club in any capacity, shall 
be liable to expulsion by said League club. Whenever a club 
releases a manager or player without notice, or gives him ten 
days' notice of release in accordance with the terms of his con- 
tract, or suspends or expels a manager or player, that club shall 
at once notify the Secretary of this League, slating, in case of 
release, the date when the same lakes effect, ami in case of 
suspension or expulsion, the cause thereof. 

NEGOTIATING FOR SERVICES. 

Sic. 28. No player, without the consent of the club with 
which he is under contract or reservation, shall enter into nego- 
tiations with any other club for future services ; but if such 
consent be obtained, a player may negotiate for his release, and 
offer a money consideration therefor, which may be accepted 
by the said releasing club. 

EFFECT OK CLUB DISBANDMENT. 

Sec 29. The disbandment of a League club, or its with- 
drawal from or loss of League membership, shall operate as a 
release of its players from contract and reservation with said 
club, but the right to contract with and reserve said players 
shall be subject to transfer to such other club as the League 
may designate after acceptance of their said services. 

ON SUSPENSION OF PLAYERS. 

SEC. 30. No manager or player, who has been suspended or 
expelled from a League club, shall at any time thereat' 
allowed to play with, or serve in any capacity, anj League club 
(either the one expelling him or any other) unless the term of 
suspension by the club has expired, or, upon his appeal to this 
League, such expulsion or suspension shall have been set aside. 
PLAYING Willi OUTSIDE CLUBS. 

Sec. 31. No game of base ball shall I"- played between a 



IO 



CONSTITUTION. 



League club and auy oilier club that lias been expelled troili 
membership in this League. No game of ball shall be played 
between a League club and any other club employing or pre- 
senting in its nine a player expelled, or under suspension from 
the League, or other wise rendered ineligible by this 1 ,eague or 
a club member thereof. A violation of this section shall forfeit 
the game in favor of the non-offending club, and subject it to 
such fine as the Board of Directors may impose. 

"crookedness" and its penalties. 

Sec. 32. Any person who shall be proven guilty of offering, 
agreeing, conspiring or attempting to cause any game of ball to 
result otherwise than on its merits under the playing rules ; or 
who, while acting as umpire, shall violate any provision of the 
Constitution, or of the playing rules adopted hereunder, may 
be forever disqualified by the President oj the League from acting 
as umpire, manager, player or in any other capacity in any game 
of ball participated in by a League club, 

THE UMPIRES AND THEIR DUTIES. 
THE STAFF of umpires. 
Sf.o. 33. A start of League Umpires shall be selected by the 
Secretary before the opening of the regular season. 

(1) They shall be paid such salaries and allowed such ex- 
penses as may lie mutually agreed upon by contract between 
them and the Secretary of the League, subject to the approval 
of the Board of Directors of the League. 

(2) They shall be under the sole control and direction of the 
Secretary, from whom they will receive all assignments to duty 
and all instructions regarding the interpretation of the playing 
rules, and the Secretary shall prescribe a proper uniform for 
them, all parts of which shall be worn while officiating as 
Umpire. THEIR DUTIES. 

(3) In the event of the failure of Umpires to umpire a game 
assigned to them, it shall be the duty of the Secretary to pro- 
vide a substitute to umpire such game ; and in such case there 
shall be deducted from the next annual payment to the League 
Umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game assigned to 
him, which for any reason he shall have failed to umpire, 

(4) ft shall be the duty of an Umpire u> enforce the rulei m 
they are written, regardless of Ms personal opinion as to their 
merit. This shall especially apply to Rule 52, Rule 60 and 
Rule 61 ; and in the event of his failure to enforce these rules 
he shall be fined S25 for the first offense and $50 for the second 
offense, upon the sworn statement of the Captain of one of the 
opposing teams and two reputable witnesses, which affidavits 
must be forwarded to the League Secretary within twenty-four 
hours of the offense. 



■MtaMMMM 



i3*m 



INSTITUTION. It 

(5) It shall be tie duty of each League club to accept as 
umpires for any championship game such League Umpires or 
substitutes as the Secretary shall assign to such game. In the 
event of the non-appearance of both League Umpires or substi- 
tutes al the hour appointed for the beginning of the game, each 
Club Captain shall then selecl one of the substitute players 
of the opposing club, and the two players thus selected shall 
be the duly authorized Umpires for that game. 

THEIR REMOVAL. 

(6) Any League Umpire shall be subject to removal by the 
Secretary at any time, and in the event of the resignation, 
removal or expulsion of any League Umpire the Secretary shall 
have power to appoint a suitable person to fill the vacancy thus 
created. 

CAUSE FOR EXPULSION. 
SEC. 34. Any League Umpire who shall in the judgment of 
the President of the League be guilty of ungentlenianly con- 
duct, or of selling or offering to sell a game of which he is 
Umpire, shall thereupon be removed from his official capacity 
and placed under the same disabilities inflicted upon expelled 
players by the Constitution of this League. 

SKTTLEMENT OF CLUB DISPUTES. 
'nil''. GOVERNING TRIBUNAL. 

SEC 35. The Board of Directors shall be the sole tribunal to 
determine disputes between clubs j the facts to be submitted, 
and the dispute adjudicated under such regulations as the 
Board shall prescribe in each case. Where such dispute is in 
relation to a game alleged to have been played in violation of 
this Constitution or of the Playing Rules, the complaint and 
accompanying proofs must be filed within live days after the 
date of said game with the President of the Board, who shall 
send a copy of- the same to the other club, with orders to file 
its answer within five days thereafter. The President of the 
Board shall in the first instance decide the dispute on its 
merits and forthwith communicate bis decision to both clubs, 
either of which may within five days appeal from said decision 
to the full Hoard. Said decision, together with all other docu- 
ments and proofs, shall thereupon be transmitted for a mail 
voir t.j the different members of the Board. The finding of 
Ihr Board shall be final, and under no circumstances shall be 
reconsidered, reopened or inquired into, either by the League 
or any subsequent Board. 

Ski'. 36. The Board shall at once consider any complaint 
preferred by a club against a manager or player of anothi 1 
club (prior to the expiration of the championship season) for 



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12 



CONSTITUTION. 



conduct in violation of any provision of this Constitution, or 
prejudicial to the good repute of the game of base ball ; and 
shall have power to require the club, to which such player or 
manager may belong, to discipline him, and upon repetition of 
such offense to expel him. Provided that such complaint be 
preferred in writing, giving such particulars as may enable 
the Board to ascertain all the facts, and such particulars shall 
lie transmitted to the Secretary, by whom it shall at one; be 
referred to the Board. 

ADJUDICATING COMPLAINTS BY PLAYERS. 

SliC. 37. In case a player, under contract with a League club, 
shall, during a current season, prefer a complaint in writing to 
the Secretary of the League against such a club, alleging that 
such club is in arrears to him for salary for more than fifteen 
days after such salary became due on account of such contract, 
the Secretary shall at once transmit to the said club a copy of 
such complaint, and require an answer thereto. On receipt of 
such answer, or if one week shall have elapsed without the 
receipt of an answer, the Secretary shall refer the paper in the 
case to the Board of Directors through its Chairman, and 
should the Board find the player's complaint sustained, they 
shall require the club, under penalty of forfeiture of its mem- 
bership, to pay to the player forthwith the full amount ascer- 
tained to be due him. Provided that should the player refuse 
to serve the club pending action by the Board on his complaint, 
he will thereby forfeit t lie benefits of the award, and in such 
case the Board shall revoke his award. 

THE COURT 'if APPEAL. 

Sec. 38. The Board shall also be the sole tribunal of the 
hearing of an appeal made by any person who shall have been 
expelled, suspended, or disciplined by his club. The matter 
shall lie proceeded with in the following manner : Such person 
shall, within thirty days after the date of the expulsion, sus- 
pension, or discipline, file with the Secretary a written state- 
ment of his defense, accompanied by a request that an appeal 
be allowed him. Tin- Secretary shall notify the club of the 
request for an appeal, accompanying such notice with a copy of 
the appeal ; and at the next annual meeting the club, by ils 

duly authorized representatn e j ami the appellant in person, by 

attorney or by written statement, shall appear before the 
Board with their testimony. The Board shall impartially hear 
the matter and render their derision, which shall be final ami 
forever binding on both 1 lull and player. 

Sec. 30. No Director .shall sit in the trial of a cause in which 
his club is interested. 



CONSTITUTION. 1 3 

Sec. 40. Any expense of trials or arbitrations shall be borne 
equally by the parties to the controversy. 

ADOPTING PLAYING RULES. 

Sec. 41. This League shall adopt such playing rules as it 
deems best for the conduct of its business. 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP RULES. 

THE COMPETING CLUBS. 
Sec. 42. The championship of the United States, established 
by this League, shall be contended for yearly by the clubs com- 
posing the League. 

DURATION OF THE SEASON. 
Sec. 43. The championship season shall extend from such 
date in April or May to such date in September or October as 
the League may determine at its stated or special meeting. 

CHAMPIONSHIP ('.AMES. 
SEC. 44. Every game played between two clubs from the 
commencement of the championship season to the completion 
of the championship series between such clubs shall be a game 
for the championship, and no League club shall lend or 
exchange players to or with each other for any game played 
during the championship season. Any violation of this section 
shall subject each offender to a fine of $ 100. 

NUMBER OF GAMES. 

Sec. 45. Each club shall play twelve or more championship 
games with every other club; but a tie or draw game or a game 
prevented by rain shall be played off on the same ground on 
the next or a succeeding date of the same or subsequent series, 
whether open or scheduled for another game between the same 
clubs, thus compelling double games for said scheduled date. 
If, however, both series shall have terminated, such postponed 
game must be played off on the ground of the other club on a 
date open or scheduled during a subsequent series between the 
same chilis. 

Sec 46. Each club shall have half of the championship 
series of games with every other club played on its grounds, 
except as otherwise provided in Section 45 ; and in all the 
details of such games, that do not involve the rights of the 
visiting club under the playing rules, but relate solely to such 
games as attractive exhibitions to the patrons of the home 
club, the visiting club shall defer to the wishes of the home 



14 



CONSTITfTION. 



club ; provided, nevertheless, that the home club shall not he 
permitted to change the usual hour for the commencement of 
scheduled games in its particular city more than thirty (30) 
minutes without fir.st having obtained the consent of the visiting 
club thereto, under a penalty to the visiting club of $500. The 
visiting club shall furnish to a person designated by the home 
club the balling order of its nine by 10 o'clock on the morning 
of the day of each game, or the evening previous, if requested. 
In case of the failure of any visiting club to furnish the batting 
order of its nine as herein stipulated, it shall forfeit the sum of 
$10, which amount shall be immediately transmitted to the 
Secretary of t lie League, upon the receipt of notice from him of 
the infliction of such fine, which notice shall be given by the 
Secretary upon receipt of complaint from the home club. 

It shall be the duty of the home club to furnish the manager 
and captain of the visiting club with a list of the batting order 
before the commencement of the game under similar penalties 
for default as herein prescribed. The visiting club shall have 
the right to practise its nine on the grounds of the home club 
between 11 and 12 o'clock A. M. on each day of its visit during 
the championship season. 

THE CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE. 

Sec. 47. All championship games shall be arranged in a 
written schedule prepared by the Schedule Committee, and 
reported to and adopted by the League by a three-fourths vote 
before the beginning of the championship season. The sched- 
ule shall provide for an equal number of return games, and 
shall specify the date of each game and the date of each series 
of games. No date in said schedule shall subsequently be 
changed, except (1) by written agreement of two clubs from a 
date fixed by the schedule for a game between such clubs to 
another day prior to the first and subsequent to the last date of 
the same schedule series between such clubs ; or (2) as pro- 
vided in Sec. 45 ; or (3) by the written consent of three-fourths 
of all the League clubs. 

Any club or clubs violating this section shall be amenable to 
a penalty of $1,000. This to apply to the clubs so playing. 
Saiil penalty to be paid within forty-eight hours to the Treas- 
urer of the National League and American Association, or if 
not so paid to be withheld from any funds to their credit in the 
hands of the Treasurer. All games played in violation of this 
section shall not count in the championship series. 

THE ADMISSION FEES AND RECEIPTS, 

Sec. 4S. The general admission fee to all championship 



CONSTITUTION. 15 

games shall be fifty (50) cents, but each club shall designate 
a part of its grounds, and provide seats thereon, the admission 
fee to which shall be twenty-five (25) cents, and all division of 
percentages shall be made on the basis of fifty (50) cents, except 
as to that part of the grounds the admission fee to which is 
fixed at twenty-five (25) cents, and as to such part of said 
grounds all divisions of percentage shall be on the basis of 
twenty-five cents. 

At the conclusion of each championship game the home club 
shall deliver to the manager of the visiting club (and shall 
transmit by mail to the President or other designated official of 
the visiting club a duplicate of the same) a statement of the 
receipts of said game, which must include all fifty-cent and 
twenty-five cent admissions, and shall pay to the visiting club 
fifty per centum of said receipts. 

SEC, 49. Out of the funds of this League now in the hands of 
the Secretary he shall create a Sinking Fund not to exceed 
$1 2,000, which shall he invested in Government bonds. All 
other funds shall he placed in the treasury to meet current 
expenses. 

THE TURNSTILE COUNT. 

Sec. 50. The number of persons admitted to the grounds 
shall be determined by the use of the necessary number of self- 
registering turnstiles, the arms of which shall extend within 
four inches of a dividing partition, the keys of which shall be 
delivered to the agent of the visiting club before the opening of 
the grounds for each game ; and said agent of the visiting club 
shall have full access to such turnstile, and the box of such 
turnstile shall not be removed until after the close of the seventh 
innings, and in case a carriage gate is used a ticket for each 
person admitted through such gate shall at once be delivered to 
the agent of the visiting club. No person shall be admitted 
free to the grounds during or prior to such game or the hour 
appointed therefor, excepting only players of contesting clubs, 
policemen in uniform, the umpires and the necessary employes 
of the home club. The visiting club shall have the right to 
accept the turnstile count for each and all games, or to count 
all tickets. Each club shall be required to use for its business 
a substantial pasteboard ticket, which can be readily counted. 

GROUND ENTRANCES. 

SEC. 51. No chili shall be allowed to have more than four 
entrances to its grounds except upon holidays, but for all such 
days the visiting club shall be given at least ten days' notice of 
the whole number and location of additional entrances ; pro- 



16 



CONSTITUTION. 



<fc 



Tided, however, emergency gates may be opened by consent of 
the visiting club if occasion requires. 

STOPPING PLAY TO CATCH TRAINS. 
Sec. 52. On any day when either club is required to leave a 
city to, or in order to reach another city in lime, where it is 
scheduled to play its next game, the home club shall be com- 
pelled upon proper notice by the visiting club to begin the game 
three hours and a half before the time of the departure of the 
last train by means of which either club can reach the next 
scheduled point in time. And either club may leave the field 
at any time within one hour of said train time without forfeiting 
any rights or privileges, provided five innings on each side 
have been played, and the Umpire shall be the sole judge of 
the time. 

GIVING OUT RAIN CHECKS. 

Sec. 53. In the event of a game being stopped by rain or 
declared forfeited before completion of five innings, the home 
club may issue rain checks, good for any succeeding game. If 
rain checks are so issued the visiting club shall not be entitled 
to its percentage of receipts; but if rain checks are not issued, 
the visiting club shall be entitled to its percentage of receipts, 
precisely as if the game had been fully played. 

ON FORFEITED GAMES. 

Sec. 54. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games — to 
count in its series as games won by a score of nine runs to none 
— in case where the umpire in any championship game shall 
award the game to such club on account of the violation by the 
contesting club of any section of this Constitution or of any 
playing rule; and in the event of such forfeiture being caused 
by the withdrawal of the players during the progress of the 
game, or by a failure to report with its team at the time fixed 
for the game, unless written notice lias been received from the 
home club that the game cannot be played, then such forfeiting 
club shall incur a penalty of one thousand dollars, and in the 
event of forfeiture for any other cause, five hundred dollars, 
which shall be payable to the Secretary of the League within 
leu days thereafter for the use and benefit of the non-offending 
club, but said fine may be remitted or modified upon appeal t" 
and a hearing by the Board of Directors. In addition to the 
penalty above referred to, the captain or manager, or the per- 
son in charge of the offending team and responsible for the 
team leaving the field, shall incur a penalty of one hundred 
dollars, which shall be paid within five days to the Secretary of 
the League, said penalty not to be remitted under any circum- 
stances. In case such penalties are not paid within the time 
named, the club and player cannot participate in a champion- 
ship game. 



CONSTITUTION. 



17 



ON DRAWN GAMES. 

Sec. 55. Drawn, tie and postponed games shall not count in 
the series as games (but any game of not less than five innings 
shall be included in the averages), but must be played off, if 
possible, as provided in Section 45. If they cannot be played 
off, as therein provided, they may subsequently be played off, 
if sufficient time exists before the close of the season. 

Double games for one admission shall not be permitted unless 
previously scheduled as such or rendered compulsory by the 
playing off of postponed games, as provided in Section 45. 

WINNING THE PENNANT. 

SEC. 56. The club which shall have won the greatest per- 
centage of games in the championship series, shall be declared 
the champion club of the United States for the season in which 
such games were played. In the event that two or more clubs 
shall have won the same percentage of games, then the Board 
shall at once arrange a special series of three games between 
any two of such clubs, such games to be played at th close of 
the championship season, and the games so played shall be 
included in the championship record, and counted in determin- 
ing the award of the championship. In such case only the 
provisions of this Constitution prohibiting the playing or re- 
cording as championship games, games played after the expira- 
tion of the championship season, shall have no effect. The 
emblem of the championship shall be a pennant (of the National 
colors) to cost not less than one hundred dollars ($100). It 
shall be inscribed with the motto, "Champion Base Ball Club 
of the United States," with the name of the club and the year 
in which the title was won, and the champion club shall be 
entitled to fly the pennant until the close of the ensuing year. 

DECIDING THE CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Sec. 57. The championship shall be decided in the following 
manner : 

Within twenty-four hours after every match game played for 
the championship, the home club shall prepare and forward to 
the Secretary of the League a statement containing the full 
score of the game, according to the system specified in the 
playing rules, together with the dale, the place where played, 
the nanus of the clubs and umpire, provided that no tie or 
drawn game shall be considered a ganu- for any purpose except 
the averages; and provided, further, that in any case where the 
Secretary shall not receive the score of a championship game 
within five days after the playing of such game, the club whose 



r8 



CONSTITUTION. 



duty it is to forward such score shall pay to the League the 
sum of $2 as the penalty of such default. 

At the close of the season the Secretary shall prepare a tabu- 
lar statement of the games won and lost by each club, accord- 
ing to the statement so sent him, which statement shall be the 
sole evidence in the matter, and submit the same, with the 
statements so sent him, to the Board, who shall make the 
award in writing and report the same to the League at its an- 
nual meeting. 

In making the award the Board shall consider : 

(i) The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

(2) Forfeited games. 

(3) Games participated in by clubs which have withdrawn, 
disbanded, or forfeited their membership without completing 
their championship series with all other League clubs ; such 
games shall be counted to the following extent : The Board 
shall ascertain the least number of championship games played 
by such club with any club remaining in the League, and shall 
from the first game participated in during the championship 
series by such retired club, count in the series of each League 
club a similar number of games, and all other games partici- 
pated in by such retired club shall not be counted in the cham- 
pionship series. Provided, that if such retired club shall have 
failed to play at least one championship game with every 
League club, all games participated in by it shall be thrown 
out entirely. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Sec. 58. The annual meeting of the League shall be held on 
the second Tuesday in December of each year, at 2 o'clock 
i>. m., ami at such places as shall have been determined by a 
vote at the previous annual meeting. 

CLUB REPRESENTATION. 

Sec. 59. At such meeting each club shall be represented and 
shall be entitled to two representatives, and to have in addition 
thereto any of its officers or ex-officers present at such meeting ; 
but no club shall be permitted to send as a representative any 
person under contract or engagement as a ball player or man- 
ager, and belonging to the nine of said club in such capacity. 
They shall present a certificate from the President or Secretary 
of their club, showing their authority to act, but no club shall 
have more than one vote. 

the league sessions. 
Sec. 60. This League may, upon a majority vote of its mem- 
bers, elect to go into executive session for the transaction of its 



CONSTITUTION. 

business, and during such sessions no club shall be entitled to 
more than two (2) representatives. 

SPECIAL MEETINGS. 

Sec. 61. Special meetings may be called by the President 
of this League on his own option or on the written call of six 
clubs. 

ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

Sec. 62. A representation of a majority of clubs shall consti- 
tute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a less num- 
ber may adjourn from time to time until a quorum is obtained. 

SEC. 63. The following .shall be the order of business, unless 
suspended by a three-fourths vote of the club members: 

1. Reading Minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of Board of Directors. 

3. Report of Committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Amendment of Constitution. 

6. Amendment of Playing Rules. 

7. Election of Officers. 

8. Miscellaneous business. 

9. Adjournment. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Sec. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League may be altered 
or amended by a three-fourths vote of the League at any annual 
meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any other time. Provided, 
however, that this section and Sections 3, 8, 48 and 49 shall 
not be altered or amended except by a unanimous vote of this 
League. 

(2) Any section of this Constitution may be suspended or its 
provision made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 
meeting. 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

NATIONAL AGREEMENT 

Of Professional Base Ball Associations Adopted by the National 
Board of Arbitration February 24, 1 896. 



The National Agreement of 



NAME. 
Article 1. This instrument shall be called * 
Professional Base Hall Associations." 

OBJECTS. 
Article 2. The objects of this Agreement arc : 

1. To perpetuate base ball as the national game of America, and to sur- 
round it with such safeguards as to warrant absolute public confidence in its 
integrity and methods. 

2. To promote and afford protection to such minor Professional Base Ball 
Leagues and Associations as may desire to operate under its provisions. 

THE GOVERNING POWER. 
Article 3. The governing power under this Agreement, which shall be 
called *' The National Beard of Arbitration," shall be vested in six repre- 
sentatives selected by the National League and American Association of 
Professional Base Ball Clubs (hereinafter designated the Major League), and 
such representatives from minor organizations of Professional Base Ball 
Clubs (hereinafter designated Minor Leagues) as may be admitted to mem- 
bership by the National Board of Arbitration from time to time under the 
rules governing membership. 

THE ANNUAL MEETING. 
Article 4. The annual meeting of the National Board shall l.c held on 
the Second Tuesday in I >._•< miber of each year, al which time the- represen- 
tatives eta [.--1 i.y t he major League shall elect a President, Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Board. 

DUTIES AND AUTHORITY OF THE NATIONAL HOARD. 
Article 5.— 1. The general enforcement of this Agreement, the protection 
of rights thereunder, the determination of all controversies as hereinafter 
provided and generally the regulation of all things within the scope of this 
Agreement are each and severally conferred upon and committed to the 
National Board of Arbitration. 

2. The Board may adopt rules and regulations prescribing the duties of 
each and all of its members and officers, its methods of procedure and the 
general transaction of its business. 

3. It shall be the duty of the Board and it shall have full and final juris- 
dt 1 'on : 

To hear and determine all disputes and complaints between associations 
and clubs ; between one club and another, members of the same or of 
different associations; between clubs and players or managers, and, in 
addition thereto, all disputes and complaints arising under and of all matters 
involving the interpretation of the National Agreement or the disposition of 
the rights thereunder, and may hold special meetings for these purposes 
when required. The Board shall have power also to pass upon any question 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



brought before it by a club member or members of any organization, where 
unjust discrimination has been made against any club or clubs, and, if upon 
a hearing, the Board finds that such charge or charges are true, it shall have 
the power to impose such fines or penalties as it deems proper, or to forfeit 
and terminate the privileges of such organization under this agreement. 
POWER TO IMPOSE FINES. 

4. In the performance of its duties the Board shall have power to impose 
fines or penalties upon associations, clubs, club officers, players, managers, 
scorers and umpires, and to suspend any such organization or person from 
the protection and privileges of the National Agreement in any instance in 
which, in its opinion, it or he shall have been guilty of conduct detrimental 
to the general welfare of the game or in violation of the letter or spirit of the 
National Agreement. 

DECISION FINAL. 

5. Its decision shall be final over any and all matters within its jurisdic- 
tion. 

REI N STAT E M E NTS. 

6. It may reinstate any person or body suspended. 

ASSESSMENTS. 

7. It shall have power to make such reasonable assessments upon clubs or 
associations as may be necessary to defray the expenses incidental to the 
performance of its duties and the enforcement of this Agreement. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS* 

8. It may make all orders, rules and regulations for the performance of its 
duties and the exercise of its power, and to accomplish the purpose Is view, 
may amend and supplement the same from time to time ; provided, notice 
of all changes, amendments or supplements be given to all organizations 
party to this agreement. 

DECISIONS PROMULGATED, 

0. It may cause its proceedings or rulings, or any part thereof, in any case 
which may be deemed of sufficient importance to serve as a precedent, to be 
published in such a manner as may be prescribed. 

PRESENTATION OF CLAIMS. 

10. Whenever any body or persons shall desire to submit any matter for 
the consideration of the l!u:inl, i i shall be presented to the chairman by a 
concise statement thereof, and accompanied by such evidence as may be in 
support of such statement. Notice shall be given to any other body or per- 
son interested in the matter to make answer and to present appropriate evi- 
dence in support thereof. 

MINOR LEAGUE MEMBERSHIP. 

ARTICLE fi. An application for membership and protection under this 
Agreement must be made in writing or by telegraph to the Secretary of the 
Board. If made by telegraph it must stale the name of the League, the cities 
comprising the circuit and have the signature of the President of the League, 
which must be followed within ten days by a written application to the Sec- 



mm 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



retary of the Board stating the name of the League, the cities comprising 
the circuit, the representatives of the respective cities, the location of their 
business offices and playing grounds, if practical, the monthly salary limit 
for its club teams and maximum monthly salary limit of its players, a pledge 
or agreement for the maintenance of said salary limit and the faithful per- 
formance of its obligations under this Agreement, its own Constitution and 
By-Laws and its other contractual obligations, which club membership, 
location of club offices and playing grounds, salary limit, Constitution, 
Agreements, By-Laws and pledges, shall not, after approval by the Board, 
be changed, modified, altered or released without the assent of the Board. 

CLASSIFICATION OF MEMBERSHIP. 
Article 7. The Board, upon the receipt of an application for protection and 
membership under this Agreement, shall, after consideration and approval, 
determine the class under which the applicant shall be admitted, the said 
classification to be based upon the average population of the cities compos- 
ing the League according to the last published U. S. Census preceding the 
application, and membership fee shall be an amount fixed by the I 
for Leagues of that class. 

MINOR LEAGUE REPRESENTATION. 
Article 8. Each Minor League shall be entitled to one representative of 
its own selection, who shall have the right to appear before the Board upon 
any or all matters pertaining to its interest or welfare, but the Hoard may, 
at its discretion, invite additional representation in the adjustment of any 
matter which may be brought before it. 

FEE FOR PROTECTION AND MEMBERSHIP. 

Article 9. The fee for membership and protection under (his Agreement, 
with the right of reservation subject to Articles 10 and 11 shall be : 

For each Club in ("lass A the sum of $75. 

For each Club in Class B the sum of $50. 

For each Club in Class C the sum of $40. 

For each Club in Class D the sum of $30. 

For each Club in Class E the sum of $20. 

For each Club in Class F the sum of $10. 
Such payments to be made within thirty days from the date of filing tbt 
written application for membership. 

SELECTION OF PLATERS BY THE MAJOR LEAGUE. 
Article 10. For the purpose of enabling players to advance in their pro- 
fession, the Major League may, at any time after the first of October of each 
year, and prior to the first of January following, with the consent of the 
Board, negotiate with any player then under contract or reservation to a 
minor league under this Agreement, and shall have the right to select such 
player, upon payment to the Secretary of the Board the stun specifiedin 
Article 12, provided that no such selection shall be enforced and no transfer 
of a player shall be made unless he shall receive an increase of salary. 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



SELECTION OF PLAYERS BY MINOR LEAGUES. 
Article 11. For the purpose of enabling players to advance in their pro- 
fusion and to assist in building up clubs of minor leagues, a club of a higher 
class shall have the right, with the consent of the Board, after January 1 of each 
year, and prior to the first of February following, to select players from a 
league in a lower class upon payment to the Secretary of the Hoard the sum 
specified in Article 12, provided that no such selection shall be enforced, and 
no transfer of a player shall be made unless be shall receive an increase of 
salary. 

TERMS FOR SELECTION OF PLAYERS. 

Article 12— Sec. 1. Clubs from a high class selecting players from 
leagues of a lower class shall pay to the Secretary of the Board for the 
benefit and account of the club from which the Selection is made the follow- 
ing sums, viz.: 

For Players in Class A, $500. 

For Players in Class H, $300. 

For Players in Class C, $200. 

For Players in Class D, $100. 

For Players in Class K, $75. 

For Players in Class K, $60. 
Sec. 2. Payments must be made at the time of selection, and unless such 
payment be withdrawn and the selection cancelled by the selecting club 
within thirty days from the date of selection, the Secretary of the Hoard 
shall remit to the club the amount received by him on account of such 
selection. 

Skc. 3. Any club entitled to make selection of a player and desiring to do 
so, shall notify the Secretary of the Hoard staling ihe name of the player 
and of the club with which he is under contract and reservation and - 
tng amount specified In Section 1, Article 12, to be paid for such release. 
The Secretary shall thereupon notify the club or league from which such 
selection is to be made and shall order his transfer to the selecting club. 
Notice of such selection and transfer shall thereupon be promulgated. 
ASSIGNMENT OF UNDEVELOPED PLAYERS. 
Article 13. For the purpose of retaining control of undeveloped but 
promising players whose releases have been purchased, all Leagues, parties 
to this Agreement, may, priorto the opening of its championship season, 
assign Us surplus players to a club member of any other League party to this 
Agreement, upon mutual agreement between the clubs interested; providing 
no other club member of the League From which the assignment is to be 
desires such player at the terms of such purchase. Notice of such 
transfers and assignments and the conditions governing must be filed with 
the Secretary of the Board, and tbe salary of the player must not be less 
than the salary limit adopted by the league to whicb he lias been assigned. 

A in*. 11. Any club member of the major league may at any time between 
April 1 and October 1 negotiate with a club member of a minor league, 
parly to this Agreement, for the release of a player from minor to major 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



league, to take effect after October 1 of the tame year, or for an immediate 
release If the Constitution of such minor league permits", and such release 

shall at once be filed with and promulgated by the Secretary of the Board 
and become binding upon both clubs party to the transfer. 

Art. 15. Any club member of a minor league, party to this Agreement, 
may at any time during its championship season negotiate for the immediate 
release of a player from a club member of another league where the league 
constitution of the releasing club permits, and such release, if secured, shall, 
when filed with the Secretary of the Board, become binding upon both clubs 
party to the transfer, providing the salary of the player so transferred dur- 
ing the championship season shall not be reduced during the balance of the 
season unless he be given an unconditional release. 
CONTRACTS. 

Article 16. Contracts between clubs and players shall be in writing in 
the form approved by the Board. An informal contract, whether evidenced 
by telegram or other writing, shall be valid for a period not exceeding 
thirty days, but a formal contract must be tendered by the contracting club 
to the contracting player within said thirty days. The failure of the club 
to so tender such formal contract will release the player from all contractual 
obligations thereunder, and the refusal of the player to execute such formal 
contract, when so tendered, shall extend the validity of his informal contract 
until he shall execute said formal contract. 

UNLAWFUL CONTRACTS. 

Article 17. No club shall at any time enter into negotiations or contract 
with any player under contract to or reservation by another club without 
the latter's consent, under such fines and penalties as the Hoard may inflict. 
APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP. 

Article 18. Applications for membership by minor leagues desiring 
protection under this Agreement must be made each year to the Secretary 
of the Board, as provided in Article 6. 

TERMINATION OF MEMBERSHIP. 

Article 19. All rights under this Agreement shall terminate on the first 
day of October unless renewed between the fifteenth and twenty-fifth of 
September of each year, according to Article 18. 
* NEW LEAGUES. 

Article 20. Newly organized leagues may ask for and be admitted to 
membership at any time, but such membership shall terminate on the first 
of October following unless renewed according to Article 19. 
RESERVATION. 

Artici.eSI. On or before the 25th clay of September in each year the 
secretaries of minor leagues, parties hereto, entitled to the privilege of 
reservation, shall transmit to the Secretary of the Board a reserve list of 
players, not exceeding fourteen in number, then under contract with each of 
its several club members for the current season, and in addition thereto a 
list of such players reserved in any prior annual reserve list who have re- 
fused to contract with sucli clubs and of all inedible players. Such play- 
ers, together with all others thereafter to be regularly contracted with by 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 



such clubs, are and shall be ineligible to contract with any other club of any 
league, except as herein prescribed. The Secretary of said Hoard shall 
thereupon promulgate such lists, provided that no club shall be permitted to 
reserve any player while in arrears of salary to him. 

RELEASE FROM RESERVATION. 

Articlk 22. The Board may also release from contract or reservation any 
player or manager when the club with which he has contracted, or by which 
he has been reserved, shall be in arrears to him for salary for more than 
fifteen days after such salary became due, or when the reserving club has 
failed to tender to any player, on or before the first day of March, after such 
reservation, a formal contract, with a salary of at least such an amount per 
month as the Board may fix as the minimum salary to be paid to such player, 
or when any such reserving club has transferred its membership after the 
close of the championship season to a different league, if the Board shall 
deem that the player will be prejudiced by such transfer. 

INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS IN CONFLICT WITH THE 
NATIONAL AGREEMENT, 

Article 23— Sec. 1. Any club member of any Minor league or associa- 
tion, a party to or identified with the National Agreement, that shall enter 
into any negotiation to become a member of or in any way co-operate with 
any organization of professional base ball clubs whose existence will in any 
manner conflict with the letter and spirit of this Agreement or the interests 
of any of the clubs operating under it, shall forthwith forfeit all rights and 
privileges conferred by this Agreement, said forfeiture to include its mem- 
bership w any association a party to this Agreement, and all rights of reser- 
vation to players reserved during the current or any preceding season. The 
penalty herein imposed shall be positive and final and shall not be revoked 
unless by the unanimous consent of the Board or upon appeal by a three- 
fourths vote of the major league. 

Sec. 2. Any officer, manager or player who shall enter into any suc^ 
negotiations as referred to in Section 1 of Article 23, or who shall agree or 
contract to play with any club a member of such organization shall be de- 
clared ineligible and subject to all the disabilities referred to in the preced- 
ing section. 

DISQUALIFIED PLAYERS. 

Article 24. When a player or manager under contract or reservation by 
any club of an association party hereto shall be expelled, suspended or ren- 
dered ineligible in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement or the 
rules of such association, notice of such disqualification shall be given to the 
Board by the secretary of the association from whose club the player 
may have been thus disqualified, and the Board shall forthwith give notice 
of such disqualification to the several leagues acting under this Agreement. 
When a player shall become ineligible under the provisions of this Agree- 
ment, or by order of the Board, the Secretary of the Board shall notify the 
several clubs acting under this Agreement of Bticfa disqualification. From 
the receipt of any such notice all club members of associations acting under 
this Agreement shall be debarred from employing or playing with or against 



sea 



NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

disqualified player until the period of disqualification shall have ter. 
minated or the disqualification he revoked by the association from which 
such player was disqualified or by the Board, and due notice of such revo- 
cation shall be given by the Board to the said several clubs. 
SUSPENSION OF PLATERS. 

Article 25. Any player who has entered into a contract with any club 
of an association party hereto may be suspended without pay or fined by 
such club or association for breach of contract or breach of any of the rules 
of such club or association, and be shall thereafter be ineligible to sign or 
play during the remainder of the current season with any of the clubs of any 
association acting hereunder, unless such disability shall have been sooner 
removed by the club or association by which he was suspended or by th« 
Board. 

ACCEPTANCE OF SERVICE. 

Article 20. Upon the release of a player from contract or reservation 
with any club member of an association then acting under this Agreement 
(unless the release be made by " selection " under Article 10 or 11), the ser- 
vices of such player shall at once be subject to acceptance by any club 
belonging to the same association, expressed in writing or by telegraph to 
the Secretary of the Board, for a period of ten days after notice of said 
release ; and, thereafter, if said services be not so accepted, said player may 
negotiate and contract with any club. The releasing club shall send notice 
to the Secretary of the Board of said player's release on the date thereof, 
and the latter shall promulgate any acceptance of his services. Provided 
that the disbandment of a club or its expulsion from membership in either 
association acting hereunder shall operate as a release of all of its players 
from contract with or reservation by said club. But the services of such 
players shall at once be subject to the acceptance of such association for a 
period of ten days for the purpoie of supplying the vacancy in its membership. 

CONTROL AND DISCIPLINE. 
Article 27. Each association shall have the right to make and enforce 
all rules and regulations pertaining to the control, discipline and compensa- 
tion of all players under contract with its club members. And it may pre- 
scribe that all contracts with its players shall be made directly with said 
association, assignable to its club members, with the right of reservation to 
be exclusively exercised by said association, in which event all the provisions 
of this Agreement applying to contracts or reservation of players with and 
by club members, shall apply to such contracts and reservation of players 
with and by said association ; provided that such rules and regulations shall 
in no way conflict with the provisions of this Agreement, or any rule, regula- 
tion or order of the Board. 

TERRITORIAL RIGHTS. 

Article 28. Each minor league whose application for membership under 

this Agreement has been accepted by the Board shall have exclusive contro 

of its own territory until the termination of its membership, and no cluh 

from any other league party to this Agreement shall be allowed to play s. 






NATIONAL AGREEMENT. 

game in any city of its circuit without the consent of the club representing 
such city, nor shall any club member of a minor league party hereto be 
allowed to play a game within five miles of any city in which islocated a 
club member of the major league without the consent of such club. 

I\i i [GIBLE PLAYERS. 

Article 29. No game shall be played between any club of any league 
acting hereunder, or any of its players under contract or reservation, with 
any club containing an ineligible player ; nor with a club that has played 
with another club containing such ineligible player. A violation of this sec- 
tion shall subject each offender to fine, suspension or expulsion, in the 
discretion of the Hoard. 

TRANSFER OF PLATERS. 

Article 30. Should a club of any association agree En writing or by tele- 
graph with another club of an association, subject to the National Agreement, 
for the release of any player then under contract or reservation with or by it, 
in accordance with the rules governing, Lithur party may file said agreement 
with the Secretary of the Board, and should any such club refuse to comply 
with its said agreement, the Board may require said agreement to be complied 
with, and may transfer the said player accordingly. 

PAYMENTS OF SALARIES. 

Article 31. Before any league shall be granted the privileges and protec- 
tion of this Agreement, it shall enact laws or regulations debarring any of its 
clubs from entering into contract with any player while under arrears of salary 
to him, and from suspending or otherwise attempting to disqualify such player 
for refusing to contract while it is so in arrears, and shall also provide for the 
expulsion of any club for refusal to pay arrears of salary to a player when 
required by said league or by the Board. 

FORFEITURE OF RIGHTS. 

Article 32. All rightsof any league hereunder shall be forfeited for fail- 
ing to expel any of its club members that may play a game of ball except 
under the Playing Rules adopted by the National League and Ameiican 
Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

DEFINITION OF TERMS. 

Article 33. The term "league or association" as herein used shall 
mean and comprise an organization of professional base ball clubs of not less 
than four clubs, whether known as a "league," "association," or by any 
other designation. 

Article 84. This Agreement may be altered or amended at any time by 
llie National League and A incrkan Association of Professional Base Hall 
1 It shall take effect and be in force from and after February 24, 18iKS, 

nnd all former Agreements are hereby revoked. 

CLASSIFICATION OF LEAGUES TO BE GOVERNED BY THE AGGRE- 
GATE POPULATION Of IMF, CITIES REPRESENTED. 

Class A 1,000,000 I Class 1> 100,600 to 060,000 

R 500,000 to 1,000,000 Class E 80,000 to 100.000 

Class C 250,000 to 500,000 | Class F— Up to 50,000 



2g 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



The Rules and Regulations of the National 
Board of Arbitration. 

The following rules and regulations have been adopted by 
the National Board of Arbitration, and are here given in order 
that they may be understood by all those interested. The same 
being adopted and to remain in force until repealed, altered, 
added to or amended. 

THE PRESIDENT. 

1. The duties of the President shall be as follows: 

(a) To issue calls for meetings of the Hoard, and preside at 
such meetings; having all powers with reference thereto which 
are incident to a presiding officer. 

(b) To rule upon and decide all incidental and routine mat- 
ters presented for determination, with power to delegate this 
duty to the Secretary or any member of the Hoard. 

(c) To supervise the performance of the duties imposed upon 
the other members of the Board. 

((/) To see that each and all of the orders of this Board are 
complied with. 

THE SECRETARY AND TREASURER. 

2. The offices of the Secretary and Treasurer may be filled 
by one and the same person, and the duties of such officer shall 
be as follows: 

(a) To receive, receipt for and disburse all moneys payable 
to this Board, and to make all financial statements required by 
the provisions of the National Agreement. 

(li) To keep the records of the proceedings of the Board, 
together with all the records required to be kept by the provi- 
sions of the National Agreement. 

(c) To issue all notices required by the National Agreement 
to be issued. 

(</) To give interpretation to the playing rules when requested 
so to do, pursuant to the provisions of the National Agreement. 

(<r) To receive all applications for membership under the 
National Agreement, and to see that the applicants pay their 
proper dues. 

(/) To give notice of all fines ami penalties imposed by the 
Board, and to see that the same are paid. 

(i r ) To attend to such other matters as maybe required •>( 
him by the Board, and to keep records of all the business and 
duties connected with the Board. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



29 



ELECTIONS. 

The Chairman and the Secretary and Treasurer shall be 
elected annually at some metting after the first of January, and 
shall hold until their successors are elected and qualify. 

OPINIONS AND DECISIONS. 

Whenever any controversy or matter to be submitted to the 
Board of adjustment or decision shall be forwarded, together 
with all evidence and documents therewith connected, to the 
Secretary and Treasurer, he shall, after submitting the same to 
the Board, promulgate or publish the opinion, which must be 
prepared by the Chairman or such other member of the Board 
as he shall designate. 

SELECTION OF PLAYERS. 

Whenever any player shall be "selected" by more than one 
club, the Board will award him to the club which shall have 
first filed formal notice with the Secretary that it desires the 
services of said player. Such notice, however, must be accom- 
panied by the deposit required by the provisions of the National 
Agreement, otherwise such notice will be of no effect and void. 
A player so awarded shall be ineligible to sign with any other 
club, and upon declining to abide by the decisions of the Board, 
may be included in the regular list of reserved players of the 
club selecting him, as per the provisions of Article 21 of the 
National Agreement. 

ACCEPTED PLAYERS. 

Whenever the services of any player released under the pro- 
visions of ihe National Agreement are accepted by any club or 
association, authorized so to do by the provisions of such 
agreement, notice thereof shall be at once given to the Secre- 
tary, who shall accordingly promulgate the fact. 

PAYMENTS. 

All expenses of the Board, including compensation to the 
Secretary and Treasurer, or to any other agent, officer or 
member of the Board for special work performed, telegraphing, 
postage and such other expenses as shall be allowed, must be 
paid by check of the Secrecary and Treasurer and vouchers 
taken thereof, which vouchers shall be submitted at least once 
a year to the Board for examination and approval. 



THE NATIONAL BOARD 



OF 



ARBITRATION 



1898 



OFFICE: WASHINGTON, I). C. 






MEMBERS OF THE BOARD: 

N. K. 5fOUNG, - - President, Secretary and Treasurer, 

1417 <; Street, Washington, 1). C. 
A. II. Soden, - - 410 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Mess. 
John T. Brush, - [ndianapolis, Iml. 

F. DeH. Robison, Cleveland, O. 

fAMi:s A. Hart, - - Fisher Building, Chicago, 111, 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF \ BALL FIELD. 




NOTE.— For Specifications See Roles From No. 2 to No. 12. 



T 



Cbe Playing Ruk$ 



# 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS 

As Adopted by the National League and American Association 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

Alterations and additions to the rules arc indicated !»y Italics. 



W 



Rule i. — The Ball Ground. 

The Ground must be an inclosed field, sufficient in size to 
enable each player to play in his position as required by these 
rules. 

Rule 2. 

To lay off the lines governing the positions and the play of 
the game known as Base Ball, proceed as follows: 

From a point, A, within the grounds, project a right line out 
into the field, and at a point, B, 154 feet from point A, lay off 
lines B C and B IJ at right angles to the line A B; then, with B 
as centre and 63.63945 feet as radius, describe arcs cutting the 
lines H A at V and' B C at G, B 1) at II and B E at 1. Draw 
lines F G, G F, E II and II F, and said lines will be the con- 
taining lines of the Diamond or Infield. 

Rule 3. — The Catcher's Lines. 
With F as centre and 90 feet radius, an arc cutting line F A 
at I., and draw lines I, M ami L O at right angles to F A; and 
continue same out from F A not less than 90 feet. 

Rule 4. — The Foul Line. 

From the intersection point, F, continue the straight UnesFG 

and 1'* II until they intersect with the lines 1, M and 1. O, and 
then from the points G and II in the opposite direction until 
they reach the boundary lines of the grounds. 

Rule 5. — The Players' Lines. 
With F as centre and 50 feet radius, describe arcs cutting 
lines F O and F M at I' and Q; then, with i as i nitre again 
and 75 feet radius, describe arcs cutting F ('• and F II at R and 

32 



PLAYING K! I I'.H. 



33 



S; then from the points I', Q, R and S .haw lines at right 
angles to the lines F 0, F M, F (1 and F H, and continue 
same until they intersect at the points T and \V. 

Rule 6. — The Captain and Coacher's Link. 
With R and S as centres and 15 feet radius, describe arcs 
cutting lines R W and S T at X and V, and from t he points X 
and V draw lines parallel with lines F Hand F G, and con- 
tinue same out to the boundary lines of the ground/ 

Rule 7.— The Three Foot Link. 

Willi F as centre and 45 feet radius, describe an are cutting 
line F G al I, and from 1 out to the distance of 3 feet draw a 
line at righl angles to F (i, and marked point 2; then from 
point 2, draw a line parallel with tint line F G to a point 3 feet 
beyond the poinl (',, and marked 3; then from the point 3 draw 
a line at right angles to line 2, 3, hack to and intersecting with 
line K G, and from thence back along line (I I to point 1. 

Rule 3.— The Pitcher's I'i.a i e. 

With point F as centre and 60.5 feel as radius, describe an 
in 1 uiting the line F 1! at a point 4, and draw a line 5, 6, 
passing through point 4 and extending 12 inches on either side 
of line F 11; then with line 5, 6, as a side, describe a parallelo- 
gram 24 inches by 6 inches. 

Rule 9.— Tun Rases. 
Within the angle F, describe a square the sides of which 
shall be 12 inches, (wo of its sides lying upon the lines 1'' G 
and F II, ami within the angles G and II describe squares the 
sid,s of which shall be 15 inches, the two outer sides oi -aid 
square lying upon the lines F ('. and ti I and F II and II I, ami 
at the angle F describe a square whose sides shall be 15 inches 
and so described that its sides shall be parallel with (1 I and 
I If and its centre immediately over the angular point E. 

Rule 10. — The BATSMAN'S Line. 

On either side of the line A F I! describe two parallelograms 
feel long and 4 feet wide ( marked 8 and 9), 1 heir length being 
parallel with the line A F I'., their distance apart being 6 inches 
ell, d lo each end of the length of the diagonal of the square 
within the angle F, and the centre of their length being upon 
said diagonal. 

Rl IE 11. 

The Home Base at F and the Pitcher's Plate at 4 must be of 
whitened rubber, and so fixed in the ground as to be even with 
the surface. 



34 



PLAYING RULES. 

Rule 12. 



The First liase at (1, t lie Second Base at E, and llio Third 
Base at II must be of white canvas hags, filled with soft mate- 
rial and securely fastened in their positions described in Rule 9. 

R111.K 13. 

The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 10 musi be 
marked with lime, chalk or other suitable material, so as to be 
distinctly seen by the umpire. 

NOTE. — for a simple way to lay off a ball field see addenda 
to playing rules on page 55- 

Rule 14. — The Ball. 

SECTION i. Must not weigh less than five nor more than 
five and one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, and it must measure 
not less than nine nor more than nine and one-quarter inches in 
circumference. The Spalding League Hall, or the Reach 
American Association Ball, must be used in all games played 
under these rules. 

Ski". 2. For each championship game two regulation balls 
shall be furnished by the home club to the umpire for use. 
When the ball in play is batted to foul ground and out of sight 
of the umpire, the other ball shall be immediately brought into 
play. As often as one of the two in use shall be lost a new one 
must be substituted, so that the umpire shall at all times after 
the game begins have two balls in his possession and ready for 
use. The moment the umpire delivers an alternate ball to the 
pitcher, it comes into play, and shall not be exchanged until it, 
in turn, passes out of sight to foul ground. At no time shall 
the ball be intentionally discolored by rubbing it with the soil 
or otherwise. In the event of a new ball being intentionally 
discolored, or otherwise injured by a player, the umpire shall, 
upon appeal from the captain of the opposite side, forthwith 
demand the return of that ball, and shall substitute another 
new ball ami impose a fine of $5.00 upon the offending player. 

Sk<\ 3. In all games the balls played with shall be furnished 
by the home club, and the last ball in play shall become the 
property of the winning club. Each ball to be used in cham- 
pionship games shall be examined, measured and weighed by 
the Secretary of the League, inclosed in a paper box, and sealed 
with the seal of the Secretary, which seal shall not be broken, 
except by the umpire, in the presence of the captains of the two 
contesting nines after play has been called. 



PLAYING UUI.F.S. 



35 



The home club shall have, at least, a dozen regulation balls 
on the field ready for use on the call of the umpire during each 
championship game. 

Ski'. 4. Should the ball become cut or ripped so as to expose 
the interior, or in any way so injured as to be, in the opinion 
of the umpire, unfit for fair use, he shall, upon appeal by either 
captain, at once put the alternate ball into play and call for a 
new ball. 

Rule 15.— The Bat. 

Must be entirely of hard wood, except that the handle may 
be wound with twine or a granulated substance supplied, not to 
exceed eighteen inches from the end. 

It must be round, and it must not exceed two and three- 
quarter inches in diameter in the thickest part, nor exceed 
forty-two inches in length, 

Rule 16. — The Players and Their Positions. 

The players of each club in a game shall be nine in number, 
one of whom shall act as captain, and in no case shall less than 
nine men be allowed to play on each side. 

Rule 17. 

The players' positions shall be such as may be assigned them 
by their captain, except that the pitcher, while in the act of 
delivering the ball to the bat, must take the position as defined 
in Rules 8 and 29. 

Rule 18. 

Players in uniform shall not be permitted to occupy seats on 
the stands, or to stand among the spectators. 

Rule 19. 

SECTION I. Every club shall adopt uniforms for its players, 
but no player shall attach anything to the sole or heel of his 
shoes other than the ordinary base ball shoe plate. 

SEC. 2. The catcher and first baseman arc permitted to wear 
a ^love or mitt of any size, shape or weight. All other players 
are restricted to the use of a glove or mitt weighing not over 
len ounces, and measuring in circumference, around the palm 
of the hand, not over fourteen inches. 

Rule 20. — Players' Benches. 

SECTION I. The players' benches must be furnished by the 
home club and placed upon a portion of the ground outside of 
and not nearer than 25 feet to the players' lines. One such 



36 



PLAYING RULES. 



bench must be for the exclusive use of the visiting club, and 
one for th" exclusive use of the home club. All players <>f the 
side at the bat must be seated on their bench, except such as 
are legally assigned to coach base-runners, and also the bats- 
man except when called to the bat by the umpire, and under 
no circumstances shall the umpire permit any person, except 
the club president, managers and players in uniform to occupy 
seats on the benches. 

SEC. 2. To enforce this rule the captain of the opposite side 
may call the attention of the umpire to a violation, whereupon 
the umpire shall immediately order such player or players to be 
seated. If the order is not obeyed within one minute the 
offending player or players shall be debarred from further 
participation in the game, and shall be obliged to leave the 
playing field forthwith. 

Rule 21. — The Game, 

Section i. Every championship game must be commenced 
not later than two hours before sunset. 

SEC. 2. A game shall consist of nine innings to each con- 
testing nine, except that 

(a.) If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine innings 
than the other side has scored in eight innings, the game shall 
then terminate. 

(//.) If the side last at bat in the ninth innings scores the 
winning run before the third man is out, the game shall 
terminate. 

Rule 22. — A Tie Game. 

If the score be a tie at the end of the nine innings, play 
shall be continued until one side has scored more runs than the 
other in an equal number of innings, provided, that the side- 
last at bat scores the winning run before the third man is out, 
the game shall terminate. 

RULE 23. — A I)ka\v\ Came. 
A drawn game shall be declared by the umpire when he 
terminates a game on account of darkness or rain, after live 
equal innings have been played, if (he score al the time is equal 
on the last even innings played; except when the side that 
went second to bat is then at the bat. and has scored the same 
number of runs as the other side, in which case the umpire 
shall declare the game drawn without regard to the score of 
the last equal innings. 

Rule 24. — A Called Came. 
If the umpire calls "Game" on account of darkness or rain 
at any time after five innings have been completed, the score 



PLAYING R01 ES. 



37 



* 



shall be that of the last equal innings played, except, thai (he 
side second at bal shall have scored one or more runs than i In- 
side first at bat, in which case the score of the game shall be 
the total number of runs mack-. 

Rule 25.— a Forfei t en Game. 

A forfeited game shall be declared by the umpire in favor of 

the club not in fault, at the request of such club, in the follow- 
iny cases: 

Section t. If the nine of a club fail to appear upon the 
field, or being upon the field, fail to begin the game within five 
minutes after the umpire has called "Play" at the hour 
appointed for the beginning of the game, unless such delay in 
appearing, or in commencing the game, be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuses or 
fails to continue playing, unless such game lias been suspended 
or terminated by the umpire. 

Sec. 3. if, after play has been suspended by the umpire, 
one side fails to resume playing within one minute after the 
umpire has called •' Play." 

SEC, 4. If a team resorts to dilatory movements to delay 
the game. 

Sic. 5. If, in the opinion of the umpire, any one of the 
rules of the games is wilfully violated. 

Sec. 6. If, after ordering the removal of a player, as author- 
ized by Rules 20, 52 and 61, said order is not obeyed within 
one minute. 

Sec, 7- If because of removal of players from the game by 
the umpire, there be less than nine players in either team. 

Sec. 8. If when two games art scheduled to be played on the 
Sinn,' afternoon, the second game In- not commenced within ten 
minutes of the time of completion of the firstgame. The umpire 
of the fust game shall be the timekeeper. 

SEC. 9. In case the umpire declares the game forfeited, he 
shall transmit a written notice thereof to the president of the 
League within twenty-four hours thereafter. However, a fail- 
ure on the part of the umpire to so notify the president shall 
not affect his decision declaring the game forfeited. 

Rule 26. — No Game. 

"No game" shall be declared by the umpire if he shall 
terminate play on account of rain or darkness before five innings 
on each side are completed. Except in a case when the game is 
called, and the club second at bal shall have more runs at the 
end of its fourth innings than the club first at bat has made in 
its live completed innings; in such case the umpire shall award 



38 



PLAYING RULES. 



the game to the club having made the greatest number of runs, 
and it shall be a legal game and be so counted in the cham- 
pionship record. 

Rule 27.- — Substitutes. 

Section i. In every championship game each side shall be 
required to have present on the field, in uniform, a sufficient 
number of substitute players to carry out the provision which 
requires that not less than nine players shall occupy the field 
in any innings of a game. 

Skc. 2. Any such player may be substituted at any time by 
either club, but a player thereby retired shall not thereafter 
participate in the game. 

Skc. 3. The base-runner shall not have a substitute run for 
him except by the consent of the captains of the contesting 
teams. 

Rule 28. — Choice of Innings — Condition of Ground. 

The choice of innings shall be given to the captain of the 
home club, who shall also be the sole judge of the fitness of the 
ground for beginning a game after rain, but, after play has been 
called by the umpire, he alone shall be the judge as to the fit- 
ness of the ground for resuming play after the game has been 
suspended on account of rain. 

Rule 29. —The Pitcher's Position. 

The pitcher shall take bis position facing the batsman with 
both feet square on the ground, and in front of the pitcher's 
plate; but in the act of delivering the ball to the bat, one foot 
must be in contact with the pitcher's plalc, defined in Rule 
8. He shall not raise either foot, unless in the act of deliver- 
ing the ball to the bat, nor make more than one step in suck 
delivery. 

Rule 30. — A Fairly Delivered Ball. 

A Fairly Delivered liall to the bat is a ball pitched or thrown 
to the bat by the pitcher while standing in his position and 
facing the batsman, the ball so delivered to pass over any por- 
tion of the home base not lower than the batsman's knee nor 
higher than his shoulder. 

Rule 31.— An Unfairly Delivered Ball, 

An Unfairly Delivered Hall is a ball delivered by the pitcher, 
as in Rule 30, except that the ball does not pass over any 
portion of the home base, or does pass over the home base, 
above the batsman's shoulder or below the line of his knee. 



PLAYING RULES. 



30 



Rule 32.— Balking. 
A Balk shall be : 
Section i. Any motion made by the pitcher to deliver the 

ball to the bat without delivering it. 

SEC. 2. Any delivery of the ball to the bat « bile bis ( pivot) 
fool is not in contact with the pitcher's plate, as defined in 
Rule 29. 

SEC. 3. Any motion in delivering the ball to the bat by the 
pitcher while not in the position denned in Rule 20. 

SEC. 4. The holding of the ball by the pitcher so long as, 
in the opinion of the umpire, to delay the game unnecessarily. 

SEC. 5. Standing in position and making any motion to 
pilch without having the ball in his possession, except in the 
case of a " block-ball," as provided by Rule 35, section 2. 

When the pitcher feigns to throw the ball to a base be must 
resume the above position and pause momentarily before 
delivering the ball to the bat. 

If the pitcher fails to comply with the requirements of this 
rule the umpire must call "A balk." 

SEC. 0. The making of any motion the pitcher habitually 
makes in his method of delivery, without his immediately 
delivering the ball to the bat. 

Sec. 7. If the pitcher feigns to throw the ball to a base and 
does not resume his legal position and pause momentarily before 
delivering the ball to the bat. 

Rule 33. — Dead Balls. 

A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to the bat by the pitcher that 
touches any part of the batsman's person or clothing while 
standing in his position without being struck at, or that 
touches any part of the umpire's person or clothing while he is 
standing on foul ground without first passing the catcher. 
Rtl.K 34. 

In case of a foul strike, foul hit ball not legally caught out, 
dead ball, or base-runner put out for being struck by a fair-bit 
ball, the ball shall not be considered in play until it is held by 
the pitcher standing in his position and the umpire shall have 
called play. 

Rule 35. — Block Balls. 

Section I. A Block is a batted or thrown ball that is 
touched, stopped or handled by any person not engaged in the 
game. 

Si, 1'. 2. Whenever a block occurs the umpire shall declare 
it and the base-runners may run the liases without being put 
out until the ball has been returned to and held by the pitcher 
standing in his position. 



4 o 



PLAYING RULES. 



Sec. 3. In the case of a Mock, if the person not engaged in 
the game should retain possession of the ball, or throw or kick 
it beyond the reach of the fielders, the umpire should call 
"Time" and require each base-runner 10 stop at the last base 
touched by him until the ball be returned to the pitcher 
standing in his position and the umpire shall have called 
" Play." 

Rule 36. — The Batsman's Position— Ordek of Batting. 

The batsmen must take their position within (he batsman's 
lines, as defined in Rule to, in the order in which they are 
named in tin- halting order, which batting order must be 
submitted by the captains nf Hi teams to the umpire 

before the game, and this batting order must be foil".'-. I 
except in the case of a substitute player, in which case the 
substitute must [akc the place of the original player in the 
batting order. After the first inning the first striker in each 
inning shall be the batsman whose name follows that of the 
last man who has completed his turn — time at bat — in the 
preceding inning. 

Rule 37. 

Section i. When their side goes to the bat the players 
must immediately return u> the players' bench, as defined in 

Rule 20, and remain there until the side is put out, except when 
called to the bat or they become coachcrs or substitute base- 
runners; provided, that the captain or one player only, except 
that if two or more base-runners are occupying the bases then 

the captain and player, or two players, may occupy the 

space between the player's lines and the captain's lines to 
coach base-runners. 

Sec. 2. No player of the side "at bat," except when bats- 
man, shall occupy any portion of the space within the catcher's 
lines, as defined in Rule 3. The triangular space behind the 
home base is reserved for the exclusive use of umpire, catcher 
and batsman, and the umpire must prohibit any player of the 
side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the 
ball is in the hands of, or passing between, the pitcher 'and 
catcher, while standing in their positions. 

SEC. 3. The players of the side "at bat" must occupy the 
portion of the field allotted them, but must speedily vacate any 

thereof that may be in the way of the ball, or any 

attempting to catch or field it. 

Rule 38. — The Batting Rules. 

Si noH i. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the batsman 

while he is standing within the lines of his position — that first 



PLAYING RULES. 



41 



touches "fair" ground, or the person of a player, or the um- 
pire, while standing on fair ground, and then settles on fair 
ground before passing the line of firsl or third base. 

SEC. 2. A Foul Hit is a similarly batted ball thai firsl 
touches "foul" ground, or the person of a player, or the um- 
pire, while standing on " foul " ground. 

SEC. 3. Should such "fair hit" ball bound or roll to foul 
ground, before passing the line of first or third base, and settle 
on foul ground, it shall be declared by the umpire a foul ball. 

SEC. 4. Should such "foul hit" ball bound or roll to fair 
ground and settle there before passing the line of first or third 
base, it shall be declared by the umpire a fair ball. 

Rule 39. 

A foul tip is a ball balled by the batsman while standing 
within the lines of his position that goes foul sharp from the 
bat to the catcher's hands. 

Rule 40. 

A bunt hit is a ball delivered by the pitcher to the batsman 
who, while standing within the lines of his position, makes 
a deliberate attempt to hit the ball so slowly within the infield 
that it cannot be fielded in time to retire the batsman. If such 
a "bunt hit" goes to foul ground a strike shall be called by 
the umpire. 

Rule 41. — Balls Batted Outside the Grounds. 

When a batted ball passes outside the grounds, the umpire 
shall decide it Fair should it disappear within, or Foul should 
it disappear outside of the range of the foul lines, and Rule 38 
is to be construed accordingly. 

Ri:lk 42. 
A fair balled ball that goes over the fence shall entitle the 
batsman to a home run, except, that should it go over the fenci 
at a less distance than two hundred and thirty-live (235) leel 
from the home base, when he shall be entitled to two bases 
only, and a distinctive line shall be marked on the fen© 11 
this point. 

Rule 43. — Strikes. 

A Strike is: 

SECTION I. A ball stunk at by the batsman without its 
touching his bat; or, 

SEC. 2. A fair ball legally delivered by the pitcher, but not 
struck at by the batsman. 

Sir. j. ,\ny intentional effort in hit the ball to foul ground, 
also in the case of a "bunt hit," which sends the ball to loul 



42 



PLAYING RULES. 






ground, either directly, or by bounding or rolling from fair 
ground to foul ground, and which settles on foul ground. 

SEC. 4. A ball struck at, if the ball touches any part of the 
batsman's person. 

Sec. 5. A ball tipped by the batsman, and caught by the 
catcher, within ten feet from home base. 

Rule 44. 

A Foul Strike is a ball batted by the batsman when any part 
of his person is upon ground outside the lines of the batsman's 
position. 

Rule 45. — The Batsman Is Out. 

The Batsman is Out: 

Section i. If he fails to take his position at the bat in his 
order of batting, unless the error be discovered and the proper 
batsman takes his position before a time "at bat " is recorded; 
and, in such case, the balls and strikes called must be counted 
in the time "at bat" of the proper batsman, and only the 
proper batsman shall be declared out, and no runs shall be 
scored or bases run because of any act of I he improper batsman, 
provided, this rule shall not take effect unless the out is declared 
before the ball is delivered to the succeeding batsman. Should 
batsman declared out by this rule be sufficient to retire the 
side, the proper batsman the next innings is the player '.oho 
would have come to bat hail the players been out by ordinary 

play. 

Sec. 2. If he fails to take his position within one minute 
after the umpire has called for the batsman. 

SEC. 3. If he makes a foul hit other than a foul tip, as 
defined in Rule 39, and the ball be momentarily held by a 
fielder before touching the ground; provided, it be not caught 
in a fielder's hat or cap, or touched by some object other than 
a fielder before being caught. 

Sec. 4. If he makes a foul strike. 

Sec. 5. If he attempts to hinder the catcher from fielding or 
throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of his position, 
or otherwise obstructing or interfering with the player. 

Sec. 6. If, while the first base be occupied by a base-runner, 
three strikes be called on him by the umpire, except when two 
men are already out. 

Sec. 7. If, after two strikes have been called, the batsman 
obviously attempts to make a foul hit, as in Rule 43, section 3. 

Sec. 8. If, while attempting a third strike, the ball touches 
any part of the batsman's person, in which case base-runners 
occupying liases shall return as prescribed in Rule 49, section 5. 

Sec. 9. If he hits a fly bail that can be handled by an 



PLAYING RULES. 



43 



infieldcr while first ami second bases are occupied, or first, 
second and third with only one out. I'.i such case the umpire 
shall, as soon as the hall is hit, declare infield Or outfield hit. 

SEC. io. If the third strike is called in accordance with 
section 4, Rule 43. 

Sec. 11. The mornenl a batsman is declared out by the 
umpire, he (the umpire) shall call for the batsman next in order 
to leave his seat on the bench and take his position at the bat, 
and such player of the batting side shall not leave his seat on 
the bench until so called to bat, except as provided by Rule 37, 
section 1, and Rule 52. 

BASE-RUNNING RULES. 

Rule 46. — When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner. 

The Uatsman becomes a Base-Runner: 

SECTION i. Instantly after he makes a fair hit. 

SEC. 2. Instantly after four balls have been called by the 
umpire. 

Six. 3. Instantly after three strikes have been declared by 
the umpire. 

Sec. 4. If, while he be a batsman, without making any 
attempt to strike at the ball, his person or clothing be hit by a 
ball from the pitcher; unless, in the opinion of the umpire, he 
plainly avoids making any effort to get out of the way of the 
ball from the pitcher, and thereby permits himself to be so hit. 

Sec. 5. Instantly after an illegal delivery of a ball by the 
pitcher. 

.In illegal delivery of the ball is made if the pitcher's pivot 
Jt'nt be not in contact with the rubier /•/ate at the time of the 
delivery of the ball, or if he takes more than one step in delivery, 
or if, after feigning to throw to a base, he fails to pause momen- 
tarily before delivering the ball to the bat. 

Rule 47. — Bases to be Touched. 
The base-runner must touch each base in regular order, viz., 
first, second, third and home bases, and when obliged to return 
(except OH a foul hit) must retouch the base or bases in reverse 
order. He shall only be considered as holding a base after 
touching it, and shall then be entitled to hold such base until 
he has legally touched the next base in order or has been 
legally forced to vacate it for a succeeding base-runner. J [ow- 
ever, no base-runner shall score a run to count in the game 
until the base-runner preceding him in the batting list (pro- 
vided there has been such a base-runner who has not been put 
out in that inning) shall have first touched home base without 
being put out. 



lUf^EiSH 



44 



PLAYING RULES. 



Rule 48. — Entitled to Bases. 

The base-runner shall be entitled, without being put out, to 
take ;he base in the following cases: 

SECTION I. If, while he was batsman, the umpire called 
four balls. 

SEC. 2. If Ihe umpire awards a succeeding batsman a base 
on four balls, or for being hit with a pitched ball, or in case .if 
an illegal delivery — as in Rule 46, section 5 — and the base- 
runner is thereby forced to vacate the base held by him. 

Sei . 3. If the umpire calls a "Balk." 

SEC. 4. If a ball, delivered by the pitcher, pass the catcher, 
and touch ihe umpire, or any fence or building within ninety 
feet of the home base. 

SEC. 5. If, upon a fair hit, the ball strikes the person or 
clothing of the umpire on fair ground. 

Sec. 6. If he be prevented from making a base by the 
obstruction of an adversary, unless the latter be a fielder having 
the ball in his hand ready to meet the base-runner. 

SEC. 7- If the fielder stop or catch a batted ball with his hat 
or any part of his uniform except his gloved hand. 

ki i.h 49. — Returning to Bases. 

The base-runner shall return to his base, and shall be entitled 
to so return without being put out: 

SECTION r. If the umpire declares a foul lip (as defined in 
Rule 39), or any other foul hit not legally caught by a fielder. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire declares a foul strike. 

Sic. 3. If the umpire declares a dead ball, unless it be also 
the fourth unfair ball and he be thereby forced to take the next 
base, as provided in Rule 48, section 2. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the umpire interferes 
with the catcher, or he is struck by a ball thrown by the catcher 
to intercept a base-runner. 

Sec. 5. The base-runner shall return to his base if, while 
attempting a strike, the ball touches any part of the batsman's 
person. 

Rule 50. — When Base-Runners Are « >i 1. 

The Base-Runner is Out ; 

Section i. ff, after three strikes have been declared against 

him while batsman ami Ihe catcher fail to catch the third 
strike ball, he plainly attempts to hinder the catcher from 
fielding the ball. 

SEC. 2. If, Inning made a fair hit while batsman, such 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a fielder before touching 
the ground, or any object Other than a fielder; PROVIDED, it be 
not caught in a fielder's hat or cap. 



l'I.A\ ING RULES. 



Sec. 3. If, when the umpire has declared three strikes on 
him while batsman, the third strike ball be momentarily held 
by a fielder before touching the ground; PROVIDED, it lie not 
caught in a fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other than 
a fielder before being caught. 

SEC. 4. If, after three slrikes or a fair hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a Beldei before he shall have 
touched first base. 

SEC. 5. If, after three strikes or a lair hit, the ball be 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with any 
part of liis person before such base-runner touches first base. 

SEC. (>. It, in running the last half of the distance from 
home base to first base, while the ball is being fielded to first 
base, he runs outside the three-fool lines, as defined in Rule 7, 
unless to avoid a fielder attempting to field a batted ball. 

SEC. 7. If, in running from first to second base, from second 
to third base, or from third to home base, he runs more than 
three feet from a direct line between such bases to avoid being 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder; but in case a 
fielder be occupying the base-runner's proper path in attempt- 
ing to field a batted ball, then the base-runner shall run out of 
the path, and behind said fielder, and shall not be declared out 
for so doing. 

SEC. 3. If he fails to avoid a fielder attempting to field a 
batted ball, in the manner described in sections 6 and 7 of this 
rule, or if he, in any way, obstructs a fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, or intentionally interferes with a thrown ball; 
I '10 t\ ii.il), thai if two or more fielders alii nipt to field a batted 
ball, and the base-runner comes in contact with one or more ol 
them, the umpire shall determine which fielder is entitled to 
the benefit of this rule, and shall not decide the base-runner 
0111 for coming in contact with any other fielder. 

SEC. 9. If, at any time while the ball is in play, he be 
touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder, unless some part 
of his person is touching a base he is entitled to occupy; PRO- 
VIDED, the ball be held by the fielder after touching him. 

SEC. 10. 'I he base-runner in running to first bast may over- 
run said base, without being put out for being off said base, 
after first touching it, provided he returns al once and re 1 ouches 

the base, after which he may be put out as at any other base 

If, in over-running first base, he also attempts to run to second 

base, or alter passing (he base lie turns to his left from the 
foul line, he shall forfeit such exemption from being pul OUt. 

SEC. 11. If, when a fair or foul hit ball (other than a foul 
lip as referred to in Rule 39) is legally caught by a fielder, 
such ball is legally held by a fielder on the base occupied by 



mm 



4 6 



n.AYING RULES. 



the base-runner when such ball was struck (or the base-runner 
be touched with the ball in the hands of a fielder), before he 
retouches said base after such fair or foul hit ball was so 
caught; PROVIDED, that the base-runner shall not be out, in 
such case, if, after the ball was legally caught as above, it be 
delivered to the bat by the pitcher before the fielder holds it 
on said base, or touches the base-runner with it; but if the 
base-runner in attempting to reach a base, detaches it before 
being touched or forced out, he shall be declared safe. 

Sec. 12. If, when a batsman becomes a base-runner, the 
first base, or the first and second bases, or the first, second and 
third bases, be occupied, any base-runner so occupying 1 
shall cease to be entitled to hold it, until any following liase- 
runner is put out, and may be put out at the next base, ot by 
being touched by the ball in the hands of a fielder in the same 
manner as in running to first base at any time before any follow- 
ing base-runner is put out. 

Sec. 13. If a fair hit ball strike him before touching the 
fielder, and, in such case, no base shall be run unless forced by 
the batsman becoming a base-runner, and no run shall be 
scored or any other base-runner put out. 

Sec. 14. If, when running to a base, or forced to return to 
a base, lie fail to touch the intervening base, or bases, if any, 
in the order prescribed in Rule 47, he may be put out at the 
base he fails to touch, or being touched by the bail in the 
hands of the fielder in the same manner as in running to first 
base; PROVIDED, that the base-runner shall not be out in such 
case if the ball be delivered to the bat by the pitcher before the 
fielder holds it on said base, or touches the base-runner with it. 

Sec. 15. If, when the umpire calls "Play," after any sus- 
pension of a game, he fails to return to and touch the base he 
occupied when "Time" was called before touching the next 
base; Provided, the base-runner shall not be out, in such case, 
if ihe ball be delivered to the bat by the pitcher before fhe 
fielder holds it on said base or touches the base-runner with it. 

Rule 51. — When Batsman or Base-Runner is out. 
The umpire shall declare tin- batsman or base-runner out, 

without waiting for an appeal for such decision, in all cases 
where such player is put out in accordance with these rules, 
except as provided in Rule 50, sections 10 and 14. 

Rule 52. — Coaching Rules, 

The Coacher shall be restricted to coaching the base-runner 
only, and shall not be allowed to address any remarks except to 
the base-runner, and then only in words of necessary direction; 



IM.AYING RUl.KS. 



47 



and shall not use language which will in any manner refer to, or 
reflect upon a player of the opposing clul>, the umpire or the 
spectators, and not more than one coacher, who may lie a 
player participating in the game, or any other player under 
contract to it, in the uniform of either club, shall be allowed 
at any one lime, except, that if base-runners are occupying two 
or more of the bases, then the captain and one player, or two 
players in the uniform of either club, may occupy the space 
between the players' lines and the captains' lines to coach 
base-runners. To enforce the above the captain of the opposite 
side may call the attention of the umpire to the offence, and, 
upon a repetition of the same, the offending player shall be 
debarred from further participation in the game, and shall 
leave the playing held forthwith. 

Kii.k 53.— Tiik Scoring of Runs. 

One run shall be scored every time a base-runner, after hav- 
ing legally touched the lirst three bases, shall touch the home 
base before three men are put out. (Exception) — If the third 
man is forced out, or is put out before reaching first base, a 
run shall not be scored. 



THE UMPIRE OR UMPIRES AND THEIR 

RESPECTIVE DUTIES. 

Rule 54- 

When two umpires are assigned to duty each shall serve 
in his regularly appointed position and discharge the duties 
of the same as provided for by this code of rules. 

Rule 55. 
No umpire shall be changed during the progress of a cham- 
pionship game, except by reason of personal illness or injury 
incapacitating him for ike discharge of his duties. 

Rule 56. 

When two umpires are assigned, one shall be known as 
the "Umpire" and the other as the "Assistant Umpire." 
'I he formers regular position in the gaaie shall be behind 
that of the ba/smau. and the tatter's position in the Held 
near either first, second or third bases: and the umpires shall 
not exchange duties during the progress of a game, except b 
consent of the captains of the opposing teams. 

Rule 57. 

The umpire shall perform all the duties devolving upon 
a s ng e umpire, except gi ring decisions on first, second 



48 



PLAYING RULES. 



and third basts and deciding points of play in running such 
bases, which shall devolve upon the assistant umpire, except as 
regards third base when any other base is occupied by a base- 
runner, in which event the umpire shall decide all points of play 
arising at third base. It shall be the duly of the umpires to 
assist or advise each other in rendering any decision when 
requested by the other umpire. 

Rule 58. 

The umpire shall act as the government representative of 
the League, and as such shall have the power to enforce 
every section of the code of playing rules of the game, 

and lie shall have the power to order any player, or captain, or 
club manager, to do or to omit to do. any action that he may 
deem necessary to .rive force or effect to the taws of the game. 

Rule 59. 

There shall be no appeal from any legal decision of either 
the umpire or the assistant umpire. 

Rule 60. 

Under no circumstances shall any player be allowed to 
dispute a decision by either umpire, in which only an error 

of judgment is involved: and no decision rendered by either 

umpire shall be reversed, except it be plainly shown by the 
code of rules to have been illegal; and in such case the captain 
alone shall be allowed to make the appeal for reversal. 

Rule 61 . 

SECTION I. In all cases of violation of these rules, 
cither by a player or a manager, the penalty shall be a 
prompt removal of the offender from the grounds, followed by 
such period af suspension from actual service in the club as the 
umpire or the I' resident of the League may elect: providing the 
term of suspension by the umpire shall not exceed three days, 
including date of removal. 

SEC. 2. The umpire shall immediately after the suspension 
of a player forward to the President a report of the suspension 
and the causes therefor. Jn flagrant cases he shall make such 
report by telegraph. 

Rule 62. 

Before the commencement of a game the -umpire shall see 
that the rules governing all the materials of the ^ann- 
ate strictly observed, die shall ask the captain of the home 
club whether there are any special ground rules to be enforced, 
and if there are, he shall see that I hey arc duly enforced, pro- 
vided they do not conflict -with any of these rules. 



PLAYING RULES. 



49 



Rule 63. 

The umpire shall not only call "play" at the hour 
appointed for the beginning of the game, but also announce 
"game Killed" at its legal conclusion. 

Rule 64 

The umpire shall suspend piny for the following causes : 
First, if rain is falling so heavily as it oblige the spec- 
tators on the Open field and open stands to seek shelter, in 
which ease he shall note the time of suspension ; and should 
rain fall continuously for thirty minutes thereafter he shall 
terminate the game* 

Rt/LE 65. 

The umpire shall suspend play in ease of an accident 
to himself or to the assistant umpire, or to a player which 
incapacitates him or them from service in the field, or in 
order to remove from the grounds any player or spectator who 
has violated the rules. 

Rule 66. 

Pn suspending flay from any legal cause, the umpire 
shall call "time;" 'when he calls •'time" the play shall 
be suspended until he calls "play" again, and during the 
interim no player shall he put out, base he run. or run he seared. 
" Time" shall not be called by the umpire until the ball is held 
by the pitcher standing in his position. 

Rule 67. 

'P'/te umpire shall call and count as a "ball" any unfair, 
ball delivered by the pitcher to the batsman, but not before 

such ball has passed the line of the home base. lie shall 
also call and count as a "stripe" every fairly delivered ball 
which passe. aver any portion of the home base, and within 
the batsman's legal range, OS de lined in Rule 43. which is not 
struck at by the batsman, or a foul tip which is caught by the 
catcher, standing close up behind the halsmrn, or which after 
being struck at ami not hit, strikes the person of the ba'tsman : 
or when the ball is purposely hit foul by the batsman, or when 
the ball is bunted foul by the batsman. 

Ki 1 E 68. 
If but one umpire is assigned, his duties and powers shall 
be that of both the umpire and the assistant umpire, and 
he shall be permitted to occupy Mich positions on the field as 
will best enable him to discharge his duties. 



50 



PLAYING RULES. 



Rule 69. — Field Kills. 
No club shall allow open betting or pool-selling upon its 
ground, nor in any building owned or occupied by it. 

Rule 70. 

No person shall be allowed upon any part of the field 
during the progress of a game in addition to the players in 
uniform, the manager of each side and the umpire, except such 
officers of the law as may be present in uniform, and such 
officials of the home club as may be necessary to preserve the 
peace. 

Rule 71. 

No manager, captain or player shall address the spectators 
during the progress of the game, except in case of necessary 
explanation. 

Rule 72. 

Every club shall furnish sufficient police force upon its 
own grounds to preserve order, and in the event of a 
-crowd entering the field during the progress of a game and 
interfering witli the play in any manner, the visiting club may 
refuse to play further until the field be cleared. If the ground 
be not cleared within fifteen minutes thereafter, the visiting 
club may claim, and shall be entitled to the game, by a score 
of nine runs to none (no matter what number of innings has 
been played). 

Rule 73. — General Definitions. 
"Play" is the order of the umpire to begin the game, or 
to resume play after its suspension. 

Rule 74. 

"Time" is the order of the umpire to suspend play. 
Such suspension must not extend beyond the day of the game. 

Rule 75. 

" Game " is the announcement by the umpire that the game is 
terminated. 

Rule 76. 

An "Inning" is the term at bat of the nine players n pre- 
senting a club in a game, and is completed when three of such 
players have been put out, as provided in these rules. 

Rule 77. 

A " Time at Bat " is the term at bat of a batsman. It begins 
when he takes his position and continues until he is put out or 
becomes a base-runner; except when, because of being hit by 



PLAYING RULES. 



51 



a pitched ball, or in case of an illegal delivery by the pitcher, 
or in case of a sacrifice hit purposely made to t lie infield which, 
not being 8 base-hit, advances a base-runner without resulting 
in a put-out, except to the batsman, as in Rule 45. 

Rule 78. 

signifies as required by these rules. 



Legal" or "Legally 



SCORING. 

Rule 79. 

In order to promote uniformity in scoring championship 

games the following instructions, suggestions and definitions 

are made for the benefit of scorers, and they are required to 

make all scores in accordance therewith. 

Batting. 

SECTION I. The first item in the tabulated score, after the 
player's name and position, shall be the number of times he 
has been at bat during the game. No time at hat shall be scored 
if the batsman be hit by a pitched ball while standing in his 
position, and after trying to avoid being SO hit, or in ease of the 
pitcher's illegal delivery of the ball to the bat which gives the 
batsman his base, or when he intentionally hits the ball to 
the field, purposely to be put out, or if he is given first base 
on called balls. 

SBC. 2. In the second column should be set down the runs 
made by each player. 

Sec. 3. In the third column should be placed the first-base 
hits made by each player. A base-hit should be scored in the 
following cases: 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground within the 
foul lines and out of reach of the fielders. 

When a hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by a fielder in 
motion, but such player cannot recover himself in time to handle 
I he ball before the striker reaches lirsi base. 

When a ball is hit -with such force to an inlieldcr that he 
cannot handle il in time to put out the batsman, (In case of 
doubt over this class of hits, score a base-hit and exempt [lie 
fielder from the charge of an error.) 

When a ball is hit so slowly towards a fielder that he cannot 
handle it in time to put out the batsman, 

That in all cases where a base-runner is retired by being hit 
by a batted ball, the batsman should be credited with a base-hit. 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the umpire, 
as defined in Rule 48, section 5. In no case shall a base-hit be 
scored when a base-runner has been forced out by the play. 



^J 



PLAYING RULES. 



SEC. 4. In the fourth column shall be placed the sacrifice 
hits, which shall lie credited to the batsman who, when no one 
is out or when but one man is out, advances a runner a base by 
a hunt hit, which results in putting out the batsman, or would 
so result if the ball were handled without error. 

Fielding. 

. SEC. 5- The number of opponents put out by each player 
shall be set down in the fifth column. Where a batsman is 
given out by the umpire for a foul strike, or where the batsman 

fails to bat in proper order, the put-OUl shall be scored to the 
catcher. In all casts of " out" for interference, running out 
of line, or infield fly dropped, the "out" should be credited to 
/ho player -oho mould ho-:;- made the play, but for the action 
of the base-runner or batsman. 

Skc. 6. The number of times the player assists shall be set 
down in the sixth column. An assist should lie given to each 
player who handles the ball in assisting a run-out or other play 
of the kind. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play in 
time to put a runner out. even if the player who could complete 
the play fails through no fault of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player who 
handles or assists in any manner in handling the ball from the 
time it leaves the bat until it reaches the player who makes the 
put-oul, or in case of a thrown ball, to each player who throws 
or handles it cleanly and in such a way that a put-out results, 
or would result if no error were made by the receiver. 

. tssists should ho credited to every player 10/10 handles the ball 
in the play which results in a base-runner being called out for 
interference or for running out of lino. 

Errors. 

Ski'. 7. An error shall be given in the seventh column for 
each misplay which allows the striker or base-runner to make 
one or more bases when perfect play would have insured his 
being put out, except that "wild pilches," " bases on balls " 
liases on the batsman being struck by a " pitched ball," or in 
case of illegal pitched balls, balks and passed halls, all of 
which comprise battery errors, shall nol he included in said 
column. In scoring errors ol batted balls see section 3 of this 
rule. 

An error shall not ho scored against the catcher for a wild 
throw to prevent a stolon base, unless the base-runner udvat 
an extra base because oj the error. 

No error shall be a ttst an infielder who attempts to 



— 



PLAYING RULES. 



53 



complete a double play, unless the throw is so wild that an addi- 
tional base is gained. 

sioik\ Bases. 
A stolen base shall be credited to the base-runner whenever lie 
reaches the base he attempts to steal unaided by ,i fielding or by 
ii battery error or a hit by the batsman. 

Rule 80. 

The Summary shall contain : 

Section i. The store made in each innings of the game. 

Sec, 2. The number of bases stolen by each player. 

The number of two-base hits made by each player. 
The number of three-base hits made by each 



Sec. 3. 
Sec. 4 
player. 

5 [ . -: 

Sec. 6. 



The number of home runs made by each player. 
The number of double and triple plays made by 
each side and the names of the players assisting in the same. 

SEC. 7. The number of innings each pitcher pitched in. 

SEC. 8. The number of base hits made off each pitcher. 

SEC. <)■ The number of times the pitcher strikes out the 
opposing batsmen. 

SEC. to. The number of times the pitcher gives bases on 
balls. 

SEC. 11. The number of wild pitches charged to the 
pitcher. 

SEC. 12. The number of times the pitcher hits batsmen 
with pitched ball. 

SEC. 13. The number of passed balls by each catcher. 

SEC 14. The time of the game. 

SliC. 15. 'I'he names and positions of each umpire. 



^m 



54 



ADDENDA. 



ADVICE TO UMPIRES. 



You are the absolute master of tlic field from the beginning 
to the termination of a game. You are by these rules given 
full authority to order any player, captain or manager to do or 
omit to do any act which you may deem necessary to maintain 
your dignity and compel respect from players and spectators. 
(Rule 58.) 

The rules are created to be enforced to the letter. If they 
are poor rules the fault is not yours. If they are disobeyed you 
are to blame. 

Before " play" is called satisfy yourself thai the field is cor- 
rectly laid off with lines, bases and plates in proper places, and 
that the materials supplied for the game are as required by the 
rules. (Rule 62.) 

Notify each captain that the rules will be enforced exactly as 
they are written, and that for each violation the prescribed 
penalty will follow. Do not in any case temporize with a rule 
breaker. 

Make all decisions as you see them. Never attempt to "even 
up" after having made a mistake. 

Be strict in what may seem to be trivial matters, thereby 
•' nipping in the bud " trouble before it fully develops. 

Specially observe Rules 20 and 37, which require players to 
occupy their respective benches; also section 6 of Rule 25, 
which specifies that a player ordered from the field shall go 
within one minute from the lime you order his removal from 
tin- game. 

I in not allow a player (not even a captain) to leave his posi- 
tion (which is the bench or coacher's box, for the captain 
w hose side is at bat, or the regular fielding position of the cap- 
t tin whose side is not at bat) to argue with you. The captain 
only is allowed to appeal to you (and he only from his proper 
l>iisitiun| on a legal misinterpretation of the rules. If he claims 
[hat you have erred, it is proper that the spectators should 
know what the claim is. (Rule 60.) 

Coachers have heretofore been a disturbing element to the 
umpire. Rule 52 provides just what his and what your duties 
nre. These rules are mandatory, nut discretionary. If you 
allow them to be violated yon become the chief culprit and 
do ii"t properly perform the duties of your position. Hear in 
mind that you are not responsible for the creation of the rules 
or iIr penalties prescribed by them. 

The umpire who enforces the rules, maintains his dignity and 
compels respect, gives the fullest satisfaction to both teams 
and to the spectators. 

Compel respect from all and your task will be an easy one. 



ADDENDA. 



55 



A SIMPLE WAY FOR LAYING OFF A 
BALL FIFXD. 

Lay a tape-line from centre of backstop out into the field 217 
feet 3% inches to second base. At 90 feet from backstop place 
home plate, with the tape-line dividing it diagonally. Hetween 
150 feet 6 inches and 150 feet 10 inches from the backstop 
place the pitcher's plate, with the tape-line dividing it at the 
centre; 153 feet 7% inches from backstop drive a stake. At 
right angles to the tape-line, and 63 feet 7% inches from the 
stake and 90 feet from both home plate and second base, place 
first base on one side and third base on the other. This done 
remove the stake. Lay lines connecting the bases thus laid, 
forming the diamond, extending the lines from home base and 
first base and home base and third base in each direction to 
the fence, thus forming the foul lines and the catcher's position. 
Parallel with these lines and 50 feet away lay the player's 
lines, extending from intersection with lines already laid 75 
feet. From this point lay lines at right angles to lines just 
described, extending to the base lines. At right angles to 
these and parallel with the base lines, 15 feet distant, lay the 
coacher's lines, extending, say, 30 feet towards the outfield. 
Parallel with and 3 feet distant from the base line from home 
base to first base lay a line beginning 45 feet from home plate 
and extending just past first base. 

On each side of home plate, parallel with line from centre of 
backstop to second base and 6 inches distant from home plate, 
lay lines 6 feet long, running three feet each way from a line 
through the centre of home plate, also lay other lines parallel 
with and 4 feet distant from the ones just described. Form 
these into parallelograms 4 feet by 6 feet in dimension, thus 
forming the batsman's position. 

Observe Rules II, 12 and 13. 






56 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



Sec. 

The C, round 

The Field 

Catcher's Lines 

Foul Lines 

Players' Lines 

The Captain and Coacher's Line 

Three-foot Line 

Pitcher's 1'late 

The Bases 

Tli. Batsman's Line 

The rTome Base 

First, Second and Third Bases 

Lines Musi He Marked 

The Ball 

Weight and Size h 

Number of Halls Furnished (2) 

Fining Player for Discoloring New Ball G2) 

Furnished by I Lime Club [81 

Replaced if Injured ill 

The Bat 

Material of (1) 

Shape of (8j 

THE PLATERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Number of Players in the Game 

Players' Positions. 

Dot to Sit with Spectators 

Club Uniforms Ill 

I iloves (8) 

Players' Benches ill 

Players Debarred from Game for Not Occupying Benches <~) 

THE GAME. 

Time of Championship (lame (1) 

Nu inlier of innings (2) 

Termination of < rame 

The Winning Run (b) 

A Tie Game 

,\ Drawn Game 

A ( ailed * lame 

A Forfeited (lame 

Failure of the Nine to A ppear 1 1 > 

Refusal of One Side to Play (21 

Failure to Resume Playing 

If a Team Resorts to Dilatory Practice < I) 

Witt id Violation 

Disobeying Order I R Player 

Less than Nine Players (7) 

Second Game to be Commenced Within Ten Minutes (8) 

Written Notice to President ''.I' 



Rri.K. 



8 
9 
10 
II 
IS 
l.'l 
II 
II 
II 

u 

11 
II 

15 
15 
16 



[8 

ir 

IS 

I '.I 
P.I 

'.'II 
'-•'I 



21 
SI 

:;i 
■j i 
as 
23 
:;i 
ss 
ss 
ss 
~'.-, 
25 
85 

SS 

ss 

25 



INDEX TO RULE I LOT) i.m.i I. L.TIONS. 



57 



Sec. 

1 'NIC tlliMllll 

Substitutes 

Sufficient Number oi So layers 1 1 i 

When Player May Be Substituted (2) 

Base-Runner (3) 

i Ihoice of 1 linings — Condition of Ground 

The Piti liar's Position 

Delivery of the Ball— Fair Ball 

i nfair Ball 

Balking 

Motion to Deceive (I) 

Foot Not in Contact with Pitcher's Plate fej 

Piti In i i in i side of Lines (8) 

Delay by Holding Ball ill 

Standing in Position to Pitch Without Having Ball (•">) 

Any Motion Made Without Immediately Delivering Ball... (6) 
If the Pitcher Feigns to Throw Ball and I tons Not Resume 

1 1 Position (7) 

\ Dead Hall , 

A Foul Strike 

Block Hulls 

Stopped by Person Not in Game..! (1) 

Bad Returned (Sj 

P.ise-K ter Must Stop (8) 

Tiie Batsman's Position — Order of Batting 

Where Players Must Remain (1) 

Space Reserved fur Umpire (2) 

Space Allotted Players "At Pal " (3) 

Hatting Rules— Fair Hit 

Foul Hit (2) 

Pair llii Win. li Rolls to Foul Ground (3i 

Foul Hit Which Rolls to Fair Ground (4) 

\ Foul Tip 

A Hunt Hit 

Balls Pat i ctl Outside the Grounds 

\ Fail Batted Ball Over the Fence — 



Ball Struck at by Batsman (I) 

Fair Hall. Delivered by Pitcher (2) 

Intentional Effort to Hit Hall to Foul Ground (3) 

I il Hit While Attempting a Hunt Hit (3) 

Hall Struck at after Touching Batsman's Person ill 

Ball Tipped by Batsman (5) 

A Foul Strike 

The Batsman is ( >ut 

Failing to Take Position at Bat in Order... : .. (1) 

Failure to Take Position within One Minute after being 
Called (2) 

II li il Hit (3) 

If he Makes a. Foul Strike il) 

Attempt '" Hinder Catcher ftw 

Three Strikes failed by Umpire fo) 

Attempt to Make a Foul Hit after Two Strikes have been 
Called (7) 

li Hall Hits Him While Making Third Strike (8) 

If II,- Hits a Fly Hail that .an I:.- Handled l>v Inlielder 
while Bases arc Occupied with only One ( 'ut <■*) 

It Third Strike is Called I I 

Batsman -Must Not Leave Bench Until Called by Umpire. .(11) 



Kit.).. 

■■<; 

27 

27 
27 

2K 
2'.l 
80 
31 
32 
83 
32 
32 
32 
32 
32 



33 
31 
.!.-, 
85 

.'i.-i 

36 



37 
37 
37 
88 
3S 
88 
88 

Hi 
41 
12 
13 
48 
43 
43 
43 
13 
43 
II 
46 
46 

48 

ir, 
46 
in 
46 

45 
45 

la 
46 

l.'i 



58 



INDEX TO RULES \.\n REGULATIONS. 



BASE-RUNNING RULES. 

Sec. 

The Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner 

After .1 Fair Hit (I) 

After Four Balls are Called (8) 

After Three Strikes are Declared (3) 

If Hit by Hall While at Hat (1) 

Alter Illegal Delivery of Ball (5) 

to be Touched 

Base-Runner Shall Not Pass Another Base-Runner to 
Reach Home Base 

Entitled to liases 

II Umpire Calk Four Balls (11 

If I 'mj lire Awards Succeeding Batsman Base (8) 

II I mplre Calls Ballc (3) 

If Pitched Ball by Pitcher Passes Catcher i I) 

Ball Strikes Umpire (51 

Prevented from Making Base (6) 

Fielder Stops Ball with Any Part of His Dress 17) 

Returning to Bases 

Ii Foul lip (1) 

If Foul Strike (8) 

If Dead Hall (3) 

If Person of Umpire Interferes with Catcher (4) 

If the I Jail Touches the Batsman's Person (5) 

Base-Runner Out 

Attempt to Hinder Catcher from Fielding Pall (1) 

If Fielder Hold Fair Hit Ball (8) 

Third Strike Ball Held by Fielder (3) 

Touched with Ball After Three Strikes (1) 

Touching First Base (5) 

Running from Home Base to First P.ase Ci) 

Running from First to Second Base (7) 

Fail ore to Avoid Fielder (8) 

Touched by Ball While In Play Ill) 

Runner May Overrun First Base (10) 

Fair or Foul Hit Caught by Fielder (11) 

Batsman Becomess Base Runner (18) 

Touched by Hit Ball Before Touching Fielder (l:i) 

Running to Base (11) 

Umpire Calls Play (15) 

When Batsman or Runner is Out 

Coaching Rules 

Scoring of Runs 

THF. UMPIRES. 

Each Shall Serve in His Regularly Appointed Position 

Umpires Shall Not Be Changed 

Titles and Positions 

Duties 

Bowers . 

\'u Appeal from Legal Decisions 

1 Msputcd Decisions 

['•■rialtics for Violation of Rules (1) 

Report of Suspension (8) 

Shall Sec that the Rules are Strictly Observed 

Shall Call Play 

Suspend Play 04 

Shall i .il Strikes.... 

When Only One Umpire is Assigned 



Kn.K 
Hi 
46 
■Hi 
III 
46 
46 
47 

47 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
49 
411 
49 
49 
49 
49 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
B0 
50 
50 
50 
50 
51 
58 
53 



54 

55 
56 
57 
58 
.7.1 
60 
01 
61 
Ii8 
63 

or,, u 

07 
68 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



59 



FIELD RULES. 

Sec. 

No Club Shall Allow Open Betting 

Who Shall lie Allowed on the Field 

Sp.:i tators Shall Not lie Addressed 

Every Club Shall Furnish Police Force 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

Play 

Time 

Game 

An Inning 

A Time at Hat 

Legal 



Hatting (J) 

Runs Hade 09 

liase Hits m 

Sacrifice Hits (I) 

Fielding 55 

Assists. m 

Errors (7) 

Stolen liases 

The Summary 

Score Made in Kach Inning (-) 

Number of liases Stolen (29 

Number of Two- Base Hits (3) 

Number of Three-Base Hits (4) 

Number of Home Runs. (5) 

Number of Double and Triple Plays (6) 

Number of Innings Each Pitcher Pitched In (7) 

Number of Base-Hits OS Each Pitcher (8) 

Number of Uatsmen Struck Out by Each Pitcher (9) 

Number of liases on Balls by Kach Pitcher (10) 

Wild Pitches (11) 

Number of Batsmen Hit by Each Pitcher (1~) 

Passed Balls Of) 

Time of (lame (14) 

Name and Position of Each Umpire (IS) 



6!) 

TO 
71 
73 



7K 
711 
79 
711 
79 
70 
79 
79 
79 
79 
80 
80 
80 



so 

H0 

80 
80 

SO 
80 
so 
80 
NO 
80 
80 



6o 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



ANNUAL MEETING NATIONAL LEAGUE 

Annual Meeting of the National League and American Asso- 
ciation of Professional Base Ball Clubs, Held at the Hotel 
Walton, Philadelphia, Pa., Tuesday, Nov. 9, J 897. 

Meeting called to order by t lie President at 2 o'clock p. M. 
No quorum being present, on motion adjourned to meet at 8 
o'clock P. M. 

Meeting called to order at 8 o'clock r. \i. 

I 'resent: 

A. II. Soden and \V. li. Conant, representing the Hoston 
ll:i~i' Hall Association. 

C. Von del Ahc and B. S. Muckenfuss, representing 1 lie St. 
Louis Base Ball Association. 

Andrew Krcedman, representing the National Exhibition 
Company of New York City. 

\V. II. Watkins and \V. W. Kerr, representing the Pittsburg 
Athletic Company. 

F. Dell. Robison and M. S. Robison, representing the 
Cleveland Base Ball Company. 

Harry C. 1'ulliain, representing the Louisville Base Ball 
Company. 

II. K. Von der Hoist and Edward 1 [anion, representing the 
Baltimore Iiase Hall and Exhibition Company. 

John 1. Rogers and A. J, Reach, representing the Philadel- 
phia Hall Club. 

C. II. Byrne and !•'. A. Abell, representing the Brooklyn 
Base Ball Club. 

J. T. Brush and N. A. Lloyd, representing the Cincinnati 

Ball Club. 

J. Earl Wagner, representing t lie National Washington 
Base Ball Club. 

James A. Hart, representing the Chicago League Ball Club. 

On motion, Mr. A. II. Soden was unanimously requested to 
act as chairman of this meeting. 



WMI 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



6l 



On motion, the reading of the minutes of last meeting was 
dispensed with. 

The report of the Board of Directors was received and 
accepted. 

The communication of W. \V. t'olville in relation to having 
championship games played in Pittsburg during the Knight 
Templars' Conclave, from October 10 to 14, was referred to 
the Schedule Committee. 

On motion, "A committee of three be appointed to consider 
the whole telegraph question, and submit its report at some 
future time." 

On motion, Messrs. James A. I fart, Andrew Freedman and 
1''. Dell. Kobison were appointed as such committee. The 
Secretary presented numerous communications in relation to 
telegraphic privileges, which were referred to the Telegraph 
Committee. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at 12 o'clock on the following 
day. 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, IS97. 

Meeting called to order at 3 o'clock P. ,\t. 

The National Hoard of Arbitration submitted its report, with 
recommendations in relation to certain changes in the National 
Agreement, which the minor leagues in Class A desired to have 
made. Pending the consideration of said report and recom- 
mendations, on motion adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock Friday, 
November 12, unless sooner convened by the President of this 
League. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1S97. 

Meeting called to order at [2.30 I'. M. 

On motion, the report and recommendations of the National 
11.. ard were temporarily postponed. 

( In motion, a committee of three v^as appointed, consisting 
Of Col. John I. Rogers, C. II. Byrne and Andrew Freedman, 
to consider amendments to the League Constitution, with 
instructions to report at the spring meeting. 

The following-named gentlemen were selected as Directors : 



62 



ANNUAL MEETING OP NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



H. R. Von tier Ilorst, A. J. Reach, J. E. Wagner, II. C. 
Pulliam, Chris Von tier Ahe and W. II. Walkins. 

The members of the National Board of Arbitration were 
unanimously re-elected as follows : N. E. Young, A. II. Soden, 
C. II. Byrne, Jno. T. Brush, F. Ve II. Robison and Jas. A. 
Hart. 

Col. Rogers submitted the following resolution, which, as 
amended, was adopted : 

Resolved, That the Schedule Committee be instructed as 
follows : 

1st. To divide the circuit into four sections — 
North and East — Boston, New York and Brooklyn. 
South and East — Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington. 
North and West — Chicago, Cleveland and Pittsburg. 
South and West — St. Louis, Louisville and Cincinnati. 

2d. To not schedule more than 12 games by a visiting club 
in any one of said sections before returning to play games On 
its own grounds. 

3d. To schedule 154 Championship games from April 15 to 
October 15, inclusive. 

Resolved, That the Committee on. Constitution be directed to 
report amendments providing that a postponed game niu^l be 
played on the next date of the same series when another game 
is scheduled between the same clubs on the ground originally 
scheduled ; but if such series shall have terminated, such post- 
poned game may, by mutual consent, be played off on the 
grounds of the other club. That the committee so modify 
Section 55 in reference to double games for one admission to 
meet above changes. 

The National Board submitted, with their recommendation, 
a petition from the Presidents of the Western, Eastern and 
Atlantic Leagues requesting that certain changes be made in 
the National Agreement, to wit : By adding to Article to of the 
National Agreement the following: "and provided further, 
the number of players to be drafted from a M iimr League Club 
in < lass A, in any one year, shall be limited to two, and that no 
player shall be subject to draft from a clul in Class A until he 



ANNUAL MEETING <)K NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



63 



lias been on the reserve list of a minor league in Class A for 
two consecutive seasons." After a full and free discussion. 
and the adoption of other suggested amendments, they were 
resubmitted to the National Board of Arbitration fur 1 heir con- 
sideration and reference to t lie said minor leagues for their 
consideration and ratification. 

On motion, the Treasurer was instructed to pay the deficit 
■ in account of the Harry Wright monument, amounting to three 
hundred and fifty-four dollars and thirty-seven cents ($354-37). 

The following preamble and resolution offered by -Mr. Hart 
was adopted : 

Whereas, The object of this organization, as expressed in 
Paragraph 3, Section 2, of its Constitution, is "to establish 
and regulate the Base Ball Championship of the United 
States," and as all contests for other objects are perfunctory 
and without the authority of the Constitution, it is 

Resolved, That this organization will in no way, shape or 
manner authorize, approve or lend its moral support to any 
game or games between the clubs of its membership, except 
those provided for in the regularly adopted schedule. 

On motion, a committee of three, consisting of N. E. Young, 
C. II. Byrne and \V. II. Watkins, were appointed to consider 
tl:e future of the "Temple Cup," with instructions to com- 
municate with .Mr. Temple and ascertain his wishes as to its 
disposition. 

On motion, the Treasurer was instructed to donate to Jno. 
Carteryvelles seventy-five dollars for loss sustained by reason 
of injury by Mr. Hurst. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock A. M. on the 
following day. 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1897. 

Meeting called to order at 10.30 A. M. 

Mr. Wagner moved that the Secretary be instructed to employ 
a staff of umpires, so as to have two umpires for each game, 
and the Playing Rules Committee was instructed to so amend 
the Playing Kules to conform with the above. 

The Secretary was instructed to prepare a schedule for the 






w 




N 



INNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL I HAGUE. 



umpire staff which shall control their movements for the entire 
m, and, under no circumstances, shall such schedule be 
rted from except in cases of illness, disability or suspen- 
sion, in which case the party filling the vacancy shall carry out 
ihe schedule of said retiring umpire. No umpire shall he 
assigned in any one city for more than six consecutive games, 
and said schedule shall not be published. 
The following resolution, offered by Mr. Brush, was adopted : 
Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed to formu- 
late and report at the Schedule Meeting a plan which will 
define foul, indecent and obscene language upon the ball field, 
prescribe a method of procedure, the penalty for which offence, 
upon conclusive proof, shall be expulsion from any further 
connection with any club operating under the protection of the 
National Agreement without the possibility of pardon or rein- 
statement. That the plan shall include the reference of any 
case that may arise under its provisions to a board consisting 
of three, who shall have no interest in any club member of this 
League. 

Messrs. John T. Brush, A. II. Seidell and Jas. A. Hart were 
selected to constitute the committee under the above resolution. 
On motion, a committee of thiee was appointed on transpor- 
tation, including sleeping-car accommodations, with instruc- 
tions to report at the Schedule meeting. Committee — Messrs. 
Brush, Robison and Rogers. 

The following resolutions were unanimously adopted : 
Resolved, That the sincere thanks of the League be extended 
to the Philadelphia Hall Club and its officers, Col, Jno. I. 
Rogers and President A. J. Reach, for the magnificent hospi- 
tality extended to the delegates of the National League and 
American Association of Professional base ball (dubs during 
this annual meeting, and for the extreme consideration and 
courtesy extended to all. 

tolved, That the delegates to the annual meeting of the 

National League and American Association of Professional 

Kail Clubs hereby desire to express tl.eir appreciation of 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



65 



the delightful entertainment provided fi >r them by the Pen and 
Pencil Club of Philadelphia. 

On motion, the dale for holding the next annual meeting was 
referred to the Committee on Constitution. 

On motion, the Committee on Telegraphing was authorized 
to make contract for the ensuing year, providing as good a 
contract can be made as the one now existing. 

( )n motion, former League players of good habits shall have 
preference for appointment as League umpires. 

An informal vote for issuing souvenir passes for 189S was 
lost by a vote of ten to two. 

On motion, the Schedule Meeting will be held in St. Louis, 
Mo., on Monday, February 2S, 1S9S, at 8 o'clock 1'. M. 

No further business appearing, on motion, adjourned. 

(Signed) A. H. SODEN, Chairman. 

N. E. YOUNG, Secretary. 



66 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



RECONVENED ANNUAL MEETING 

Reconvened Annual Meeting of the National League and Amer- 
ican Association of Professional Base Ball Clubs, Held 
at the Southern Hotel, St. Louis, Mo., Com- 
mencing Monday, Feb. 28, J 898. 

Meeting called to order at S u, U. 

Present : 

A. II. Soden and W. H. Conant, representing the Boston 

Base Ball Association. 

C. Von der Ahe and B. S. Muckenfuss, representing the 
St. Louis Base Ball Association. 

A. H. Socle n, representing the National Exhibition Company 
of New York. 

W. II. Watkins, representing the Pittsburg Athletic Com- 
pany. 

Edward llanlon, representing the Baltimore Base Ball and 
Exhibition Company. 

II. ('. l'ulliani, representing the Louisville Base Ball Com- 
pany. 

\. I. Reach and John I. Rogers, representing the Phila- 
delphia Ball Club. 

James A. Hart, representing the Chicago League Ball Club. 

F. A. Abell and Charles If. Ebbets, representing the Brooklyn 
Base Ball Club. 

John ')'. Brush, representing the Cincinnati Base Ball Club. 

J. Earl Wagner, representing the National Washington Base 
Ball Club. 

F. Dell. Robison and M. S. Robison, representing the Cleve- 
land Ball Club. 

On motion, Mr. A. II. Soden was unanimously invited to 
officiate as chairman of this meeting. 

On motion, the minutes of the annual meeting were read and 
approved. 

President Young officially announced the death of C. II. 
Byrne, late President of the Brooklyn Club. On motion, a 



ANNUA!. MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



"7 



committee consisting of John T. Brush, James A. Hart ami 
Col. John I. Rogers was appointed to draft suitable resolutions 
in retatioo to the sami 

The Temple Cup Committee submitted its report, which was 
adopted. 

The Committee appointed to consider amendments to the 
League Constitution submitted its report, which was adopted, 
as follows (see Constitution). 

At the suggestion of Mr. Brush, it was unanimously agreed 
that when we adjourn we adjourn to meet at 10 o'clock on the 
following day for a session of two hours, and that we then 
take a recess until 2 o'clock r. M., at which time the committee 
appointed at the annual meeting to formulate a plan for the 
suppression of, and punishment for, foul, indecent and obscene 
language and conduct upon the ball held submit its report. 
On motion, Mr. [as. A. Hart was appointed a committee of 
one to invite all representative newspaper men to be present 
when Chairman Brush submits his report. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at 10 A. M. on the following 
day. 

TUESDAY, MARCH I, 189S. 

Meeting called to order at 1 1 o'clock A. m. 

President Hart, Chairman of the Telegraph Committee, sub- 
mitted his report. On motion, the report was received, the 
Committee discharged, and the matter of telegraphing be left 
in the hands of each individual club. 

The Committee on Transportation submitted its report. On 
motion, the report was received and the committee continued 
nniil the annual meeting in December. 

On motion, a recess was taken until 2 o'clock r. M. 



I \\, M \K< II I, IS; 



-2 OCLOCK I'. M. 



Meeting called to* order by Mr. Soden, Chairman, who 

announced that the League had agreed upon this hour to hear 
the report of the committee appointed at the November meet- 
ing to report upon the suppression of vulgarity upon the ball 
Held. Jle stated that inasmuch as the subject was one of very 



-— «-. — •- 1_- ■ 



68 



ANNUAL MKKTING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



great public interest and had largely engaged the attention of 
the press, it had been decided by the League to admit the 
representatives of the press upon this occasion so that there 
might be no misunderstanding regarding the necessity for 
action by the League upon this subject. After a few well- 
chosen remarks of welcome to the large number of newspaper 
representatives present, Mr. Soden called upon the chairman 
of the committee for the committee's report. 

Mr. Brnsh, upon taking the floor, said : " Before entering 
upon the business for which this meeting is called, the com- 
mittee that was appointed at a former meeting of this body to 
take appropriate action regarding the death of Mr. Byrne, 
desires to submit the following • In Memoriam.'" 

5n HUmoriom. 

Mr. PRESIDENT : V. n annual session to transact the 

business of the League. The same causes that have convened 
us in the past have brought us again together. We are ani- 
mated by the same motives that have influenced us in former 
years, and the promotion of the best interests of the National 
League occupies our attention. 

While we are thus engaged we are conscious of the absence 
of a vital force that has been potent in former conventions. 
Cognizant of the loss we have sustained in our counsels that 
comes from wisdom, judgment, loyally, and courage of convic- 
tion, it is fitting and proper that we should pease in our delib- 
erations and pay such tribute as we may to the memory of one 
who has been foremost in legislating for the elevation and 
promotion of the sport most loved by Americans and who has 
active in its establishment upon a solid ami permanent 
basis. 

Charles II. Byrne was born September 15, 1843, and died 
January 4. 180.S, after an illness of more Mian one fl 

He became interested in base ball in the spring of 1883, 
having organized the Brooklyn Base Ball Association, and 
from that time until the last meeting of the Nation 
during the second week in November, 1897, at Philadelphia, 



ANNUAL MEETING OP NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



69 



he lias liecn an important , in all thai relates to the 

modi in history of tin- game. 

What is herein set forth relati 1 Bolelj to Mr. Byrne's cnn- 
nei linn with tin/ National game, which may be likened unto a 
ship upon a troubled sea, tossed by advi rse « ind ami tide upon 
many a rock ami reef, oft threatened with wreck ami destruc- 
tion, yet lias weathered the si. inns of fate and rides in 
upon the calm and unruffled waters of popularity and public 
confidence. 

We will cross the threshold of Mr. Byrne's life where he, in 
the interest of the National sport, began his work of devotion ; 
speak of him as he appeared during the years in which his 
name became honored among lovers of the game ; and, in grief 
and sorrow, within the domain of hallowed Calvary, part with 
him where the rays of a winter's sun fall aslant the tomb that 
received him. 

Mr. Byrne possessed a thorough knowledge of every detail 
of base ball. He was equally at home whether discussing the 
Playing Rules, the Constitution, the National Agreement, or 
measure of reform calculated to advance the general good 
of all engaged in the game, whether in the interest of major or 
minor organization. lie has been foremost in the prom 
of every progressive measure. lie has been a leader in every 
debate. He has taken sides upon every question that involved 
the rights of players, the interest of the public and the recog- 
nition of the press. No detail that was pertinent has ever 
been deemed too small to receive his consideration. The small 
as well as the great was indexed in his character. 

Mis ability and sagacity have made him a conspicuous figure 
upon the National Hoard of Arbitration, and his discernment 
and executive capacity have given him prominence upon all 
important Committees, He has been earnest, steadfast and 
modest ; arduous and enduring ; calm amid alarms, yet alert ; 
watchful of vested rights, but unselfish; firm in opinion though 
not intolerant ; rigid in his faith an. I graciously yielding if 
Onted with conclusive logic. The elevation of the game 
and the approbation of the public were the primary ntc 



rv 



70 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



with Mr. Byrne; his individual interest was secondary. Mr. 
Byrne was an ideal exponent of tlie game. Diplomatic, cour- 
teous, friendly, with a brain that could reason, a tongue that 
could pursuade, and a logic that could convert, he was enabled 
through penetration and judgment to blaze a pathway through 
many a jungle of difficulty. 

Some stand upon a pedestal so narrow that there is room 
upon it for but one. Mr. Byrne stood upon one so broad that 
there was always room for those who shared his views or who 
became converts to them. 

The full measure of Mr. Byrne's worth as a man was appre- 
ciated most perhaps in his friendships. "Pure friendship is 
something which men of an inferior intellect can never taMe 
and the vulgar herd estimate it by its advantages." Loyal, 
considerate, obliging, mourned and missed by friends who 
loved him for what he was and for what he did, it will be said 
of him, " When he departed lie look a man's life with him." 

Nothing can cloud his fame ; tablet of stone or bronze can 
add no leaf to his laurels. His monument is the game itself 
and the record of his effort and devotion in its archives the 
inscription, and to this we leave him. 

J Wilis A. II ART, 
JOHN I. ROGERS, 
JOHN T. BRUSH, 

( 'ommittee. 

Upon motion of Mr. A.J. Reach the report of the Memoriam 
Committee was ordered spread upon the records, and the 
President of the League was directed to incorporate the same 
in a memorial page in the Annual League Book, together with 
the tributes received by the committee from the representatives 
of the press. 

Mr. Brush, chairman of the committee to formulate a plan 
for the suppression of, and punishment for, foul, indecent and 
obscene language and conduct upon the ball field, submitted 
the committee's report. In presenting the report Mr. 1 
read numerous letters from umpires giving their personal ex- 
periences, also a detailed account of the vile language that 



ANNUAL MEETING ('!•' NATIONAL I. HAGUE. 



71 



they hod been forced to listen to on the ball field, must of 

which had been directed i" them personally. He also pre- 

d a clear and concise statement from the earliest history 

of professional base ball up to [lie present time of the efforts 

made and [lit- laws enacted ai various times for the suppression 
of this growing evil which threatens the life of our great 
National game, and the necessity for prompt and heroic action 
at this time to suppress it. 

A measure entitled : 

44 A measure for the suppression of obscene, Indecent and vulgar language 
Upon the ball field by players engaged in playing a game of ball during the 
championship season, while under contract to a club, member of the National 
1 rue and American Association of Professional Ball Clubs, to the end 
that the game may retain its high position as respectable and worthy of 
the confidence and support of the refined and cultured classes of American 
citizenship." 

In pursuance of this measure of reform and to define and carry into 
effect its intent and purposes, be it resolved as follows: 

I ii 1 It shall be the duty of each club president or chief officer to 
furnish to the manager or captain of his team a printed or typewritten copy 
of this enactment, together with a copy of the offences and evils which are 
l) to be remedied by this measure, all of which shall be read and fully 
explained to all of the players and employees of the club at the beginning of 
the contract season and to all others who may thereafter join the 1 lab 
during the playing season, and a copy thereof shall also be delivered to such 
players and employees, and the explain and manager of each club shall 

obtain for and deliver to the ; I said club, who shall within live 

days thereafter forward tl the President of the League, the signa- 

of all the players and empl ■ ■ ' club, acknowledging that this 

don with all of its provl teen brought to each anil every 

playei ' ■ or 1 attention. 

Second — To 'all as the national game of the United 

States, preserve its respectability, surround it with such additional safe- 
guards as to wai rant absolute pubti< confidence in its methods and purposes, 

to reform and promote the mutual interests of professional has.- ball clubs 
and professional base ball players, it shall be competent for any person or 
, whether player, manager, umpire, club official of any club, mem- 
ber of this League, or spectator, to submit information and testimony in 
writing under oath concerning obscene, indecent orvulgai tan 
than profanity, that being otherwise an< provided for in the play- 

ing rules) during the progress of a game upon the ball field by a player or 
employee of a National League club ol have personal knou 

The information and corroborative evidence under oath may be submitted to 
the President of the League, who shall have the right to suspend the 



mmm 



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72 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



offender pending investigation by the tribunal hereinafter created, or not, as 
lie may elect, being governed in judgment by the circumstances and gravity 
of the offence dence. 

Third— AH charges ol offence under tMs measure with the supporting 
evidence shall be submitted to the President of the League under oath 
within forty-eight hours of its alleged commission, and the President shall 
immediately furnish a copy of the same to the accused for his defence, with 
wrii ten notice of the suspension, if any. 

Fourth — Any one under contrai to a National League club who may be 
ed with using offensive language within the intent and meaning of this 
measure, shall be furnished with a ropy ol the 1 barges, which, to receive con- 
sideration, must be substantiated by corroborative evidence, and after the re- 
ceipt thereof by the accused five days, shall be allowed the one charged with 
the offence for transmitting by some express company to the President ol the 
League, under oath, of the defence, and the case when thus prepared shall 
be submitted by the President to a tribunal of three judges selected by tins 

ue, to he call.:- 1 the " Board oi Di icipline," who shall hi 
authority to acquit or convii 1 upon the eviden* •■ submitted, according to the 
rules adopted for its government, and from which there shall be no appeal, 
except to the Hoard of Directors of the League, as hereinafter provided. 

Fifth— When a case is thus submitted to said board the President of the 
tribunal shall carefully consider it from the evidence submitted, taking into 
account the nature and gravity of the offence, its importance as affecting 
the welfare of the national gam-', the provocation for its commission, and 
such other circumstances as may be submitted that are entitled to b< 
sidered. He shall report in writing his opinion and finding in the pri n 
and if the offence be proven he (hall aiiiv the penalty that in his judgment 
should be imposed, and forward the same, together with his opinion and 
conclusions and all the papers, to his associate nearest in territory, who shall 
attach thereto bis opinion and conclusions and judgment, and forward the 
same to the remaining member of the tribunal, who shall forward his 
opinion, conclusions and finding, and all the papers in the case to the presi- 
dent of the tribunal. He in turn shall return the papers and opinions, con- 
clusions and findings to the President of the League, who shall carry into 
. . laid board or a majority thereof, by suspending the 

player from his club for the peri :■! by the tribunal or a majority, 

or acquit him, as th< 1 a ■<■ may be. 

Sixth— When the members of the tribunal or a majority thereof do not 
tpon a judgment, the President of the League shall one of 

the opinions as the one to be followed (providing it i>e not the extreme 
penalty!, and that shall be considered the judgment and be enforced accord- 
ing tO the provisions of section 5. 

Seventh The penalty for using obscene, indecent, and vulgar Ian. ■ 
within the meaning and intent of this measure, is entirely within the discre- 

■■'■ the tribunal, and may h □ for d -ys, for months,) 

unexpired season, for a year, or for life, according to the conditions, circum- 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



73 



stances ami nature of i"ie offence, U being the sentiment of the League that 
creates this law that an unwarranted, unprovoked, and brutal use of vulgarity 
to a Bpectator t or within the presence nf spectators and within the hearing 

of ladies, should dehar the offender forever from service with his club, or 
any other club, member of this League or subject to its jurisdiction. 

Ki^lilli The extreme penalty proposed iii ibis measure, namely, "life 

expulsion," shall require the unanimous approval of the three memb 
the tribunal, and provided also, before imposing such a penalty, the accused 
shall be notified, that he can defend in person and by counsel, if he eleets, in 
which event the President of the tribunal shall call a meeting of said board 
at some city to be selected by him moat convenient to the members and the 
accused, the traveling expenses and hotel bills of the board to be paid by 
the League. 

Ninth— When two members concur in the penalty to be imposed, that 
shall be considered as the judgment of the tribunal, except as provided in 
rules and 8. 

i ttth— That justice may be d'>n<* and no wrong committed, It shall be 

tent for either parties i<> ■< case submitted to the tribunal I 

under oath the character and standing of those who mil;'- id.- charges and 

give evidence, and before the ** life expulsion " can be imposed the accused 

i! he elect, have the opportunity of cross-examining the witnesses 

against him by depositions. 

Eleventh— There shall be no appeal from a decision by the tribunal or 
n majority for a hearing or reopening ol u ■■ ■-■ '-pi by unanimous vote of 
the Board of Directors, based upon new avid) 

Twelfth — The tribunal shall bl the National League with due 

d for fitness, integrity, knowledge of and interest in the national game 
bait One of its members shall be designated President of the 
tribunal, and no one shall be a member who Es financially interested in a 
club member of this League, v. lubmitted under the pro- 

of this enactment, i the tribunal shall carefully 

examine all evidence submitted, and render his finding according to the 
and no hearing shall be secret, u quested by both parties to 

the ' onti oversy, 

Thirteenth The first tribunal under this provision shall be composed of 
L. C. Krauthoff, who shall be eli irs or until his W 

cessor i Louis Kramer, who shall serve two years or until Ids 

or is elected, and Frederick K, one year or 

until hi ucces oi inning with 1899 and each year there- 

after there shall be one memb* i 

Fourteenth- M a player under suspension pending investigation should 
be acquitted by the tribunal, his salary shall be paid by the President of the 

1 for the lime lie was under suspension. 

Fifteenth i i ■ > nsate En pan for the loss b of a player who 

en suspended under these | an one year, 

the club may select one member of the l eague to represent it, ind the Presi- 



74 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



dent of ihe League shall select some member of the League to represent the 
League, and the two, if unable to agree, shall select the third member of 
the League, and they or a majority of them shall pi. ire ;t f;iir estimate of 
value upon the release of the player so disciplined, and the League shall pay 
to the club one-half of such award, and in case said persons or a majority 
do not arrive at an award, said Roard of Discipline or a majority thereof 
shall make the award. 

Sixteenth— All elections to fill vacancies in the tribunal shall he by ballot 
upon nominations, and it shall require a majority vote to elect. 

Seventeenth — All vacancies in the tribunal caused by death 01 
shall he temporarily filled by ihe President of the League, until the next 
meeting at which an annual election occurs, when it shall he filled by ballot 
for the unexpired term. 

Eighteenth — The compensation to be allowed to the members of the 
tribunal shall be fixed by the President of the League according to the cir- 
cumstances of eacli case, and he paid by the League, together with traveling 
expenses and hotel hills, if they meet together as provided in section 8. 

Nineteenth — For all communications with this tribunal the express com- 
panies shall he used in lieu of the United States mail. 

Twentieth — The annual meeting for the election of members to fill 
vacancies upon the tribunal shall be the annual schedule meeting of the 
League. 

Twenty-first — This enactment for the government of players may be 
altered or amended at any annual or schedule meeting of the League by a 
majority vote. 

Twenty-second— The President of thi authorized to publish this 

measure in the Official records of the League book, and to provide a suf- 
ficient number of copies of the same to supply all requirements "f a tii 
distribution among players and employees of the clubs, members of the 
National League, 

Twenty-third— The members of said hoard shall meet at some com 
point within thirty days from its creation and establish rides and regula- 
Eor its government not inconsistent with this "measure,* 1 and shall 
hart the right to employ a Btenographei at the expense of the League in the 
cases mentioned in section 8 at any joint meeting of the members of said 
board. 

After a full discussion of the report it was, upon motion, 
unanimously adopted. 

On motion, adjourned to 3 o'clock P. M. 

Meeting called to order by the chairman at 8 o'clock p. M. 

( in motion, a unanimous vote of thanks was tendered to Mr. 
J. T. Brush for lite very able manner in which lie presented 
the committee's report in what is known as the Bmsh Resolu- 
tion, also to the committee, of which Mr. Brush was chairman, 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



75 



for the very able resolutions presented in relation to the death 
of Mr. Byrne. 

On motion, it was unanimously agreed that hereafter we 
accept no banquets at any League meeting. 

On motion, that when we adjourn we adjourn to meet in 
New York City on ihe second Tuesday in December. The 
dale for holding the annua] meeting of the Board of Arbitral ion 

i ilso changed to same date. 

On motion, adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock A. M. on the fol- 
lowing day. 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 1898, 

Meeting called to order at 12 o'clock noon, and proceeded to 
consider amendments to the Playing Rules, which as amended 
were adopted as follows (see 1'Iaying Rule-). 

The Schedule Committee submitted its report, which was 
unanimously adopted. 

On motion, a recess was taken until 8 r. \i. 

Meeting called to order at 8 o'clock P. M. 

On motion, the committee known as the " Brush Committee" 
be continued. 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted : 

Rtsolved, That as a mark of respect to the memory of the 
late Charles II. Byrne, this body hereby declines to fill the 
existing vacancy in the National Hoard of Arbitration, and 
that no steps be taken to till the vacancy until the time of said 
vacancy shall be terminated by limitation. 

The Secretary presented communications from the Sporting 
Life Publishing Co., and the Sporting News of St. Louis, in 
relation to advertising official matter for 1898. 

On motion, it was decided that the League would not employ 
an official organ for the present year. 

On motion, the following agreement, introduced by John T. 
Brush and signed by the Presidents of League Clubs, becomes 
a part of our records : 

In the interest of reform upon the ball field, and to prevent 
rowdyism, ungcntlemanly conduct and unnecessary contention 



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76 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



by ball players, I agree to instruct my manager, and agree that 
he shall instruct his players, that no decision t.i an umpire or 
assistant umpire, whether right or wrong, just or unjust, shall 
be questioned or disputed by a player on my team during the 
schedule season of 1898. Thai I will insist upon the strict and 
unequivocal enforcement of the Playing Rules, which provide 
as follows : 

Coach 1 Nf; Ruxjss, 
The Coacher shall be restricted to coaching the base-runner only, and 
shall not be allowed to address any remarks except to the base-runner, and 
then only in words of necessary direction ; and shall not use language which 
will in any manner refer to or reflect upon a player of the opposing club, the 
umpire or the spectators, and not more than one coacher, who may be a 
player participating in the game, or any other player under contract to it, 
in the uniform of either club, shall be allowed at any one time, except, that 
if base-runners are occupying two or more of the bases, then tin: captain and 
one player, or two players in the uniform of either club, may occupy the 
between the players' lines and the captains' lines to coach base- 
runners. To enforce the above the captain of the opposite side may call the 
attention of the umpire to the offense, and, upon a repetition of the same, 
the offending player shall be debarred from further participation in the 
game, and shall leave the playing field forthwith. 

The Sole Judge of Play. 

SECTION 1. The umpire is the sole and absolute judge of play. In no 
Instance shall any person, except the captains of the competing teams, be 
allowed to address him or question his decisions, and they (the captains) can 
only question him as to tit,- legal interpretation of the rules ; ami tiny shall 
not be permitted t<> lean- their proper positions in so doing unless Permitted 
by the umpire. The proper positions are: The Coa,h,?'\ fox for the tap- 
tain /or the side which is at l-at, and his regular fielding position ' 

captain in the field. No manager or any other official of cither club shall 

be permitted to go on the field or address the umpire, under a penalty of a 
forfeiture of a game. 

I agree to discipline any player, captain or manager on my 
team who violates this agreement. 

1 also agree to discipline any player, captain or manager who 
may deserve it for a violation of this agreement upon the ball 
Jichls of my associates if advised of the necessity for doing so 
by the President of the club upon whose grounds the offense 
was committed* 

I further agree to use every legitimate effort to afford visiting 






ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



77 



chilis full protection from the abuse of spectators upon my 
grounds. 

J. T. BRUSH, 

1'i.sl. ( irii innati Ball Club. 

JAMES A. 11 ART, 

Prtst, Chicago tragus Ball Club, 
J. EARL WAGNER, 

National Ball Club^ Washington^ />. C 

A. H. SODEN, 

Prist, boston Base Ball Association. 
FRANK Df.II. ROBISON, 

Prest. Cleveland Base Ball Co, 

HARRY C. PULLIAM, 

Brest. Louisville Base Ball Club. 

EDWARD HANLON, 

/'rest. Baltimore Base Ball and Exhibition Co, 

CHARLES II. EBBETS, 

Prist. Brooklyn Ball Club. 

W. II. WATKINS, 

I'rest. Pittsburg Athletic Co. 

A. J. REACH, 

Prat. Philadelphia Ball Club, I.im. 

B. S. MUCKENFUSS, 

Prest. St. Louis Bass Ball Club. 
ANDREW FREEDMAN, 

Prest. New York Base Bali Club. 



(Adopted.) 



Mr. 



ADDRESS TO FLAYERS. 



.1898. 



Dkar Sir : 

At a meeting of the National League and American Association of Pro- 
fessional Base Kail Clubs, held in St. Louis, February 28, [806, a measure 
was adopted for the suppression of the use of obscene and vulgar language 
by ball players upon the ball field. The enormity of this evil and (lie extent 
te which it has grown, as shown by the v.»,i amount of evidence thai was 
submitted by those having a knowledge of the facts, has made it imperative 
('ii the part of the League to adopl drastic measures for its suppression. 

This committee is instructed by tin . serve all players under 

contract to a club member of the National League and American fkssocia- 

Eton Of Professional Base Ball Clubs with a copy of the law above referred 

to, which will be in force this season. You are requested to carefully read 
the same and become acquainted with all of its provisions and its Intents 
and purposes. We say to you frankly and cmphatic.dly that vulgarity and 



78 



ANNUAL MEETING OF NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



obscenity upon the bail field must be stopped, regardless of results to the 
player who gives off< 

This adress, the law, and the private instructions will be furnished and 
read to you, and you aw each required t>< sign an acknowledgement, to be 
filed with the President "t the League, that this measure is fully undei 
The Board of Discipline is i omp i who have had large experience 

in matters pertaining to base ball* They arc men of national reputation and 
all selected to ^tvc upon ibis tribunal because of fitness, high cfaara* ter and 
interest in the future of the game. No member of the tribunal has a finan- 
cial interest in the Nation i in any of its clubs ; thei 
may be expected to act impartially and for what may be deemed to 

the besl interest of base ball. 

If any player suffers because of this law of reform and its penalties, it 
will be his own fault. There is nothing in the game that calls for the Use "f 

vile language, and the League is positively determined that ungentlen 
language in a gentleman's game shall no longer be permitted. In the 
let it be understood that no player need ever again submit tamely and with- 
out redress to the filthy and insulting language of an opposing player. In 

the future let it be understood that the umpire is not without redress and is 
not to lie driven into resigning because >if the vile insults which u ill aoi 
mit lii tii to serve longer without entire loss of sell respect. 

Lei it be distinctly understood that in the future we propose to protect the 
patrons from the villainously filthy language that is used by a very limited 
number of players. Let it be fully understood by club official, umpire and 
player that this measure results from a cry of alarm from the press and the 

and in response to the universal demand for reformation the 

■if to the press and public to suppress the evils hereby 
BOUght to be remedied at any or whatever cost. 

T. Brush, j 



On motion, adjourned. 
N. E. YOUNG, Secretary. 



James A. Hart, > Committee, 

A. H. SoDKN, 



A. IF. SO HEX, Chairman. 



i 



OFFICERS AMI PLAYERS. 



79 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS 

The following is ;m official list of the officers of the National 
League ami American Association of Professional Base Hall 
ciulis, ami officers and players of clubs, members thereof, for 

tliu season of 1898, so far as completed to March, 1S98. 

N. E. YOUNG, President arid Secretary, 

1417 G St., X. W., Washington, !>.('. 

DIRECTORS. 
II. R. V*ON DER HORST, A. J. REACH, J. E. WAGNER, 

II. c:. rt i.i.iwi, C. Von der Ahe, 
\v. II. Watkins. 



CHICAGO BALL CLUB, CHICAGO, II. I,. 
I \ ■;. A. Hart, President, Thos. Burns, Manager. 



\V. L. Everett, 
T. C. Donahue, 
Geo. A. Decker, 
M. J. Kittridge, 
\\'m. A. Lange, 

It. I" . BriggS, 



]■ isher Building, 
\1. Eilroy, 
W. I. Dahlen, 
C. C. Griffith, 
J. J. < 'allahan, 
Jas. Ryan, 
1 1. Friend, 



W. J. McCormick, 
W. M. Thornton, 

W. S. Woods, 
1'. I.. Chance, 
I'. Ishell, 
I. * lonnpr. 



BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, BOSTON, MASS. 
A. II. Soden, President, 410 Atlantic Ave. 



Martin Bergen, 
I-'. A. KJbbedanz, 

W. ('.. Mills, 
V. Willis, 

II. Duffy, 

! .. C. Long, 



W. E, BransBeld, 
Win. II. Keister, 
Chas. Sialil, 

I'. Ti imcy, 

Win. R. I [amilton, 

Edward M. Lewis* 



R. M. I. owe, 
J. R. Slivclls, 

. Veager, 

('lias. Hickman, 
C. K. Pittinger, 

Jas. J. Collins. 



BALTIMORE BASE BALL CLUB, BALTIMORE, Ml>. 
EDWARD HaNLON, President! Room 2, American BIdg. 

Hughes, f. Sli T. O'Brien, 

W. Robinson, J. Quinn, W.J.Clark, 

I. McGraw, McGana, E. DeMontreville. 

J. Mc James, 






8o 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 



BROOKLYN HASH BALL CLUB, BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

ClIAS. II. EBBETS, President. F. A. A bell, Treas. 

J. Anderson, Jas. Sheckard, T. J. Tucker, 

W. W. Hallman, J. Yeager, P. j. Crlsham, 

I-'. C. Ilansfield, J. H. Grim, A. Smith, 

Will. Kennedy, F, A. Junes, J. Dunn, 

H.P.Payne, A. I). 'Miller, E. E. Horton, 

J. II. Ryan, J. W. Bean, Ceo. LaChance. 
Win, Shindle, 



CLEVELAND BASE BALL COMPANY, CLEVELAND, 
Frank De HASS Roiiison, President, Cuyahoga Bldg. 



II. C. Blake, 
J. C. Burkett, 
I, Belden, 
C. L. Chi Ids, 
G. Cuppy, 
L. Creiger, 
T. Esterquest, 



Geo. Kelb, 
E. f. McKean, 
L. W. McAllister, 
J. O'Connor, 

j. Powell, 

O, I ). Pickering, 
L. !•', Sockalexis, 



O. Telieau, 
R. J. Wallace, 
I). T. Young, 
C. L. Zinimer, 
J. R. McAleer, 
I'. Wilson, 
Burt Jones. 



CINCINNATI BASE BALL CLUB 
J. T 



T. Breitenstein, 
]•'. Dwyer, 
\V. Oammann, 
C, S. Dorin, 
J. Goar, 
J. \V. Holliday, 
Charles Irwin, 



BRUSH, President. N. A. Li.ovd 
Court and Plum Streets. 

McFarland, 

C. II. Peitz, 



CINCINNATI, 
Treas. 



E. Smith, 
W. Schriver. 

Steinfeldt, 

R. Wood, 



I liinv Vaughn, 
C. li. Miller, 
A. G. McBride 
I. A. Mcl'hee, 
\V. C. Hill, 
|. P. Beckley. 



NATIONAL EXHIBITION CO., NEW YORK CITY. 

Andrew Ekkkdman, President, 142 Broadway, 
II. A. BONNELL, Secretary. 

M. Tiernan, 
G. E. Van Haltrer, 
I. |. Warner, 
P. A. Wilson, 
\V. R. Wilmot, 
D. W. Zearfoss, 



Wm. Joyce, 

\V. Ii. Burns, 
G. S. Davis, 
E. R. Dolieny, 
Wm, Gleason, 

Chas. Gettig, 
M. J. Sullivan, 



J. li. Seymour, 
M. W. Grady, 
F. Ilartman, 
T. L. McCreery, 
J. Meekin, 
Amos Rusie, 
P. A. Sperlein, 



OFFICERS AND PLAYERS. 



Si 



PHILADELPHIA BALL CI. UK (Limited), PHILA. 
A. J. Reach, President, Jno. I. Rogers, Treas, 
Fidelity-Mutual Building, 



PA. 



R, I). Cooley, 
Edw, McFarland, 

A. Orth, 

Monteford Cross, 
Edw. Abbotticchio, 
Wm. Duggleby, 
Newt Fisher, 



(',. T, Stallings, Jno. A. ISoyle, 

S. I.. Thompson, J. P. Fifield, 

E. |. Delehanty, N. Lajoie, 
Edw. Dunkle, W. B.Douglass, 
Geo. Wheeler, [acob fameson, 

F. L. Donohue, W. H. Piatt, 
E. Flick, N. Elbeifiehl, 
Edw. Murphy, 

LOUISVILLE BASE BALL CLUB, LOUISVILLE, KY. 

II. C. PuLLIAM, President. BARNEY Dkeyecss, Treas. 

510 Equitable Building. 

E. Cunningham, W. Clingman, W. Magee, 
\V. II. Clarke P. Howling, (lias. Stewart, 

F, Clark, W. E. Hoy, Win. Wilson, 

PITTSBURG BASE BALL CLUB, PITTSBURG, PA. 
W. II. Watkins, President, 1120 Park Building, 



P, J. Donovan, 
1 1. Davis, 
Wm. P'agan, 
W. F. Ely, 
J. Ganzel, 

Gray, 

C. M. Hastings, 

ST 



W. F. Hart, W. P. Rhines, 

J. IIofTmeister, A. Sliaw, 

F. Killen, J. H. Tannehill, 

J. A. McCarthy, Wm. Wolfe, 

II. O'llagan, [. A. Gardner, 

1). Padden, W. S. Brodie, 

J, Rothfuss, S. I.eever. 

LOUIS BASE BALL CLUB, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

B. S. MuCKENFOSS, President, 2809 Grand Ave. 
Jas. llughey, J.B.Taylor, W. Carsey, 

T.Smith, J. W. Holmes, D, l.ally, 

L. Bierbauer, T. J. Dowd, L. Cross, 

(. I Gilpatrick, P. I). Coleman, G. A. Turner, 

R. II. Hall, T. E. Clifford, K. J. Ilarley, 

P, Daniels, C. J. Crooks, J. Clements. 

WASHINGTON NATIONAL BASE BALL CLUB, 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Geo. W. Wagnek, President. J. 

E. G. Dixon, W. E, Donovan, 

Chas. Farrell, A. Weyhing, 

T. Leahy, John Doyle, 

T. T. Brown, W. B. Mercer, 



•;aiu. Wagner, Treat, 

M. S. A mole, 
A. Selbach 
Jus. McGuire, 
I tcob Gettman, 



"fln /IDemoriam. 

CHARLES H. BYRNE. 

Mr. President : We meet in annual session to trans- 
act the business of the League. The same causes that 
havi i - id thi past have brought us again to- 

gether. We are animated by the same motives thai have 
influenced us in former vears arid the promotion" of the best 
interests of the National League occupies our attention. 

While we are thus engaged we at -us of the 

absence of a vital torce that has been potent in former 
conventions. Cognizant of the loss we have sustained in 
our counsels that comes from wisdom, judgment, loyalty, 
and courage of conviction, it is lilting and proper that 
we should pause in our deliberations ami pay such 
tribute as we may to the memory of one who has been fore- 
most in legislating for ihe elevation and promotion of the 

rt most loved by Americans and who has been ai 
in its establishment upon a solid and permanent I asi 

Charles II. iByrne tvas born Sept. 15, 1843, aim died 
Jan. 4, 189S, after an illni :S3 of more than one year. 

He became interested in base ball in the spring of 
1SS3, having organized the Brooklyn base Ball Associa- 
tion, and from until the last meeting of the 
National League during i i week in November, 
al Philadelphia, he has been an important person- 
age in all i ltrn history of the game. 

What is herein set forth relates solely to Mr. Byrne's 
connection with the National game, which may be lik- 
ened unto a ship upon a troubled sea, tossed by adverse 
wind and tide upon many a rock and reef, oft tin. ati m d 
with wreck and destruction, yet has weathered the 
storms of fale ami rides majestic upon the calm ami un- 
ruffled waters of popularity and public fcoi 

We will cross the threshold of Mr. Byrne's life where 
he, in the interest of the National sport, began his work 
of devotion ; speak of him as he aj hiring the 

years in which hi; nam< became honored ami 
of 1 hi 1 , within the domain 

of hallowed Calvary, part witli him where the rays of a 
winter's sun fall aslant the tomb that received him. 

Mr. Byrne posses • ago know! cry 

detail of base ball. lb- was equally at home whether 
discussing the Playing Rules, the Constitution, the- 
re of I eform 1 I 

lated to advance the general good of all engaged in the 



game, whether in the interest of major or minor organi- 
zation. He has been foremost in the promotion of every 
;ressive measure. He has been a leader in every 
ite. He has taken upon every question that 

involved the rights of players, the interest of the public 
and i he recognition of th pr< No detail thai w as 

pertinent has ever been deemed too small to reci ive lis 
consideration. The small as well as the great was in- 
d < 1 in his character. 

His ability and sagacity have made him a conspicuous 
figure upon the National Board ol Arbitration, and bis 
lit and executive capacity have given him 
prominence upon all important committees. He has 
earnest, steadfast and modest : arduous and endur- 
ing; calm amid alarms, yet alert; watchful of vested 
rights, but unselfish; lirm in opinion though not intoler- 
ant ; rigid in his faith and graciously yielding if con- 
fronted with conclusive logic. The elevation of the 
game and the approbation of the public were the pri- 
mary motives with Mr. Byrne; his individual interest 

was secondary. Mr. Byrne was an ideal exponent of the 

game. Diplomatic, courteous, friendly, with a brain 

that could reason, a tongue that could persuade, and a 

that could convert, lie was enabled through pene- 
tration ami judgment to blaze a pathway through many 
a jungle ol difficulty. 

Some stand upon a pedi tl there is 

room upon it for but one. Mr. Byrne Btood upon one so 

broad that there was always t tl for those who shared 

his views or who became converts lo them. 

The full measure of Mr. Byrne's worth as a man was 
appreciated most perhaps in his friendships. " Pure 
friendship is something which men of an inferior intel- 
an never taste and the vulgar herd estimate it by 
its advantages." Loyal, considerate, obliging, mourned 
and missed by friends who loved him for what he was 
and for what he did, it will be said of him, " Whi 
di parted he took .< ' lift ■■■ il h him." 

Nothing i an i loud his la ; tabli I of stone or limn, e 

can add no leal to his laurels. His monument is the 
game itsell and t In- ffort and devotion in 

its archives the inscription, and to this we leave him. 



JAMES A. HART, ) 

"|t >|l\ I. ROGERS, ' -mini//,; 

JOHN T. BRUSH, ) 






S4 



TKIBU'lK.s OF THE PRESS. 



TRIBUTES OF THE PRESS. 

"Integrity, honesty, sagacity and sincerity were the chief attributes of 
Charles H. Byrne, who was a man in every sense of the word, and a true 
friend. His loss is irreparable, and it will be many years before the National 
League will find his equal. In his dealings with the newspaper fraternity 
he earned the respect and admiration of all, because he always said what he 
thought, and was at all times above board. His death is mourned by every 
base ball writer in Greater New York." — Joseph Vila, New York Sun. 

" Knowing Charles II. Byrne from the time of his entree into base ball, I 
can truly say that not only the National game but the newspaper fraternity 
as well lost a valued friend when the Great Umpire called him out." — Rem 
Uulpord, Jr., Cincinnati Post. 

"So long as base ball lives the name of Charles H. Byrne, who helped to 
place the game on the high standard which it now occupies, will nevei 
— J. Ed. Grillo, Cincinnati Commercial Tribune. 

"The spirit of Charles H. Byrne, his wisdom, tact and a I tributes as i man 
can never b>: ■ om the si mil of memory that lce< - en the 

names <<f Hulbert and Harry Wright." — Job CaMPSSLL, Sporting Editor 

Washington Post. 

To our departed friend, Charles H. Byrne — 

Staunch as the sturdy forest tree 
That stands defiant of the gale, 
A true and toyal friend was he. 
Not one to falter or to fail. 

And we thai knen him ill can spare 
His helpful n eds of grace. 

. nd ever fair 
The flow'rs above his resting place. 

— C. B. Power, Pittsburg Leader. 

" The National League loses a tireless and consumacious worker for the 
best interests of base ball, one whose good efforts were always equal 
power, in the death of Charles H. Byrne."— W.u. i hk M. ROBUON, Sporting 
Editor Cleveland Plain Dealer. 



] l;ll:l TES OF I HE PRESS. 



85 



"Charles H. Byrne »vas to the great National game what John Marshall 
was to American constitutional law, it-- builder and moulder. He was more 
than that, he was the far-seeing statesman that builded for the future of 

ill as well as for its i 111 mediate Well-being, He was the 'Tally rand that 

by his diplomacy st< ase ball ship of state between many a storm 

encin led Scylla and Chan bdi i in safety, and best oi all, he was a generous, 
whole-souled, honest gentleman." — Frank F, Patterson, Base Ball Re- 
I" 'i ter Ball imore Sun. 

,. J Wm, C, W atkins, Base Ball Editor Baltimore American. 
[Joseph Cdmmings, Base Ball Editor Baltimore News. 

"Nap rtg the magnati end of minor leagues, dia- 

mond boulder in foundation of National game this was Charley Byrne." — 
T. II. Murnane, Boston Gl< 

"A Napoleon in has.- ball as field marshal of the American Association, 

who would not evei 1 to a Wellington of the National i 

! upon terms of equity g laranteed to all interested parties; a just 
and brilliaj faithful and lovable friend." — 

iii FogeLj Philadelphia 1 ■ 

" President Byrne's death i ■■ the most serious blow base ball lias sustained 
in many years."— Bert Crowhuri r. Sporting Editor Philadelphia Bulletin. 

" Brooklyn, whose honor he upheld in life and where his body now lies in 

, mourns the 1 I H, Byrnes Lhe most ardent and faithful 

supporter of the National game. He did more than any other to promote 

the welfare and honesty not alone of base ball bat of all else as well." — 

\ \ 1 lgbk, Brooklyn Eagle. 

"Mr. Byrne had a kind heart. That means he possessed nearly all the 
other virtues. — K. S. Sheridan, Sporting Editor Chicago Tribune. 

" The leath of C. H« Byrne i> irreparable. 1 

of mserval ive legislation." — 

Ed. W. s.mi 1 ir, Sporting Editor Chicago Times-Herald. 

"The recent d< tth of < hai ■ H. Byrne was a sad blc-n ball He 

stood for all that wa hem 1 . 1 lean and upright in this our National 

ts a pillar of the sport and enj ■ I his convictions." — 

Wn.t, L. Douglas, Sporting Editor Louisville Courier-Journal. 



"The Pittsburg public regard* 
and energetic men ■ ■ ■ .- ball. He spared neithei 

iiey in advam 

John H. Gruber, Sportin ttsburg Post. 

M. NsLLiSf Sporting Editor Commercial Gazette. 



r 



86 



l RIB1 l ES OF THE PRESS. 



" Base ball lovers the country over will miss the coming season one of the 
truest frienda the gaiw ' : •Charles K.Byrne.**— LovisSass, Sporting 

Editor Chicago Record, 

" In the death of Byrne base ball has suffered an irrenn As a 

man ami a friend he will be missed more than as a magnate," - II. S. Ful- 
lkbton, Base Ball Editor Chi ago I ribune. 

" Byrne's mission in base bail world was a comprehensive one and he ful- 
filled it nobly, leaving his impress indelibly stamped on National game, tie 
was uncommonly endowed with brilliant ideas and ability to advocate them. 
V. a ever prompted by honesty of purpose, forb faring to opponents and a 
real friend to the player and patron of the game. 1 *— John D. Pkinglb, 
Sporting Editor Pittsburg Dispatch. 

"Charles If. Byrne was a steadfast, strong and wise defender of good 
faith, good morals and good sense in the National game of America." — 
\V. K. MbRRlCK, Cleveland Leader. 

" Base ball writers may well mourn the loss of such a friend and sympa- 
thizer as Charles II. iiyrne."~jACOli C. fcfORSB, Huston Herald. 

"Byrne's loss to base ball almost irreparable. He was white-souled 

king among men, and clubfl and players will ever reverence his memory." — 

James Nolan, Sporting Editor Louisville Dispatch. 

M (liarles H. Byrne's name wi > base ball posterity along with 

two grand figures of the National game, W. H. Hulbert and Harry 

It was my pleasure t" be intimately acquainted with the late 
President of the Brooklyn club. He was a thorough sportsman, a just 
arbitrator, a fr'eud of the player and a power in the legislative councils of 

base ball."— Harry M. Weldon, Sporting Editor Cincinnati Enquirer. 

i i [] of America had DO greater friend than the late 

C. H. Byrne. He showed his appreciation of them by hut honest dealings 
with them, and th im for it." — C. H. Zubes, Sporting Editor 

Cincinnati Times-Star. 



<f 



''Official League Statistics 



# 



COMPILED BY N, E. YOUNG, PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL LEAGUE. 

BATTING RECORD 

Of Players Who Have Taken Part in Fifteen or More Cham- 
pionship Games — Season of J 897. 



Keeler 

Clark 

Kellcy 

Stivetls 

Burkett 

Delehanty 

Lajoie 

Stahl 

C». Davis 

Doyle 

ienntngs 
,ange 

Stenzel 

DeMontrevillc 

Rothfuss 

Onh 

Collins 

J Wagner 

) Hamilton — 

Duffy 

Wallace 

Melinite 

Childt 

Mercer. 

J Van Haltren. 

) Anderson.. . . 

j Tienian 

I Sockalcxis... 

j Thornton . . 

) Tucker 

Holliday 

I Long 

•(Cooley 

( Douglas. . . . 



Cl.lTB. 



Baltimore 

Louisville 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Philadelphia 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

New York 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Chicago 

Baltimore 

Washington 

Pittsburg 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

Louisville . 

Boston 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Washington 

! ill'.! 

Washington 

New York 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Cleveland 

Chicago 

Boston and Washington. 

Cincinnati 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

St. I .ouis 



128 
[29 

I 'i'.i 
19 
128 
129 
126 
111 
181 
II I 168 
11. ■ 186 
117 182 
181 588 

81 ! 112 
42 1 17 

(J I '.Ml 

126 t 

Hi I 554 
[81 522 
828 
148 
185 
571 
iss 
584 
281 
i-,.s 



93 HI 



111 

42 
l:il 
Hi; 
129 

tie, 

71 

98 870 

58 189 
106 152 
181 566 
125 522 



181 


154 


.858 


119 170 




118 189 


,851 


92 197 


.849 


111 


.'i'.i 


848 


26 


51 


.847 


102 


IS.", 




88 


s;i 


.844 


153 


174 


.844 


181 


189 


.841 


99 


17," 


19 


52 


111 




105 


llll 


886 


22 


I.'. 


888 


122 


I'.KI 


.882 


98 


162 




i :.'.■; 


177 


881 


CI 


98 


.881 


in 


86 


.829 


RQ 




III 


62 




R8 


1 is 


.827 


124 


is:, 




4 1 


171 





356 '.'II 



258 

245 

50 

69 

I SB 
111 

264 

264 
152 

is; 
57 

•i;;' ( 

IX 

i 106 

' 167 

87 

-Jul 

- 209 



28 



ii 
hi 
62 

i; i;ii 
988 
877 

I 8 

I 70 
18 I:. 
1417 



87 






88 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 

batting records — Continued, 



28 
29 

30 

81 
82 
83 



Name. 



58 



M 



Karrell 

1 Donovan. 

I McGraw 

\ Tenney 

I Bcckley 

Bowerman 

Jones 

Griffin 

) Selbach 

1 Miller , 

Klobedanz 

Gettman 

i Lowe 

-' Zinimer 

| Everett 

Robinson 

HolTmeister. . . 

I Smith 

on 

\ Wilson 

Schriver 

f Leahy 

[Allen 

j Davis 

; Ryan 

A. Smith 

t LaCha 

1 Callahan 

I McPhee 

I Decker. 

i Vaughn 

(Joyce 

Anson 

) Werden 

I 1 Lirtiitan. . . . 

Brodie 

Peitz 

i Connor 

Dahlen 

( Pickering. . . 

Irwin 

Dexter 

< Hoy 

O'Connor.. . . 

( Shoch 

(Turner 

< Shindle 

/ Keitz 



55 



Club. 



O 



Washington 65 

Pittsburg ISO 

106 
181 

111 
:;:; 

135 
:U 

136 



< 

257 

478 

889 

:,i;i; 

48 

127 

■ >■'■* 

:,:io 

1st; 

113 139 

88 186 

87 1 16 

121 500 

81 296 

80 879 



Baltimore 

Boston 

New York and Cincinnati 

Baltimore 

Brooklyn 

Brooklyn 

Washington 

Cincinnati 



Washington 



Cleveland 

Chicago 

Baltimore 47' 182 

Pittsburg 4V 189 

Pittsburg 128 168 

New Yo,k 184 568 

Mew York 4-1 158 

Cincinnati 62 174 

Washington and Pittsburg.. 43 145 

Boston 83 

Pittsburg 105 I ' 

Chlcag [36518 

Brooklyn HI 

Brooklyn 

Chicago..,. 

I 

nnati 

rlc 110 3W 



Louisville 

St. Louis 126528 

Pittsburg 

iti 78 258 

77 81 

75 2 

Louisville and Cleveland... 101) 421: 

Cincinnati 134 505 

Louisville 08 24C 

Cincinnati 128 198 

Cleveland 

n 79272 

St. Louis H>2 

in 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati I"« 



DO : "I 
110 



Corcoran 

Rusie New York ..- Si 

St. Lotos ISO 

. Harley St. Louis 

[ Ritchie Cincinnati 100 88! 



.827 

.828 
.825 
.826 
,82a 
.822 
.820 
.81! 
811 
.816 
,:;i.'i 
,: J ,ll 
..'ill 
.814 

.811 
.811 
.810 

:iii 
.810 
,809 
.809 
.809 
,806 

80* 
.80! 
.80! 
.805 

801 

,801 

..'« 1 1 
298 
■Jli- 
.296 
.296 
,296 
.298 
.29! 
.290 
.ago 

,889 



■- 
H 
lii'i 

is.', 

lit; 
216 

-.'in 
18 

218 

22! 
229 

I SB 
R 
ill 
217 
122 
154 
Ii5 
111 
214 
198 
65 
76 
80 
45 
206 
240 
HO 
285 
1 in 
118 
HI 
82 
168 
167 

19! 

1 1; 
102 

1 -j- 1 
130 



28 

58 

ai 32 

1 



161 
186 
100 
185! 
161 
98 1 

289121 

12 16 



8 

IS 

7 
27 

11 

I 

28 

in 
7 
8 
9 
8 
28 
BB 
11 
80 
1.'! 
in 
13 
I 
::i. 
in 
in 
is 
17 
i 5 
5 18 
18 Ml 



8|40 
111 86 
2.11 

6 22 

12 9 

II) 



■JsK 185 

288 118 



01 1 
6 20 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 
BATTING KF.CORMS — Continual, 



89 



S7 



r>s 



xa 



I 1 h\ yer 

\IH reery.. . 



I Dofl d, 
- Holme 
\ Wrielt 



66 
6' 

«S 

68 

JO 

71 

72 

71 

7.-. 
7i; 

77 
78 

n 

SO 

81 

82 

R'l 
HI 



Dowd». 

ey . ... 

I Clarke 

(Ely 

Padden 

I Smith 

( Meekin 

... LaUy 

GgjSullivan 

84Grady 



! ■ I 

f 



Friend 

I \I. Kenn,. . . . 

; \|. * tormick.. 
\ Mcrritt 

r.i eitenstein. 

/ Stafford 

( Burke 

Kennedy. . . . 
' ■ ey 

1 M Farland. 

tu 

hill 



\ !■ I. 

' Quinn 

1 

1 Grim 



) Nash 

I Gillen 

in I ".-it 





I Payne 



J Shugart 

I John ■ 

right . - 

* Hallman 

Seymour 





Club. 



! 



lington 116 

Cincinnati 85 

Louisville ami New York... 188 522 

Philadelphia 88816 

St. Louis and Philadi 

Louisville and New VerL... 80806 

Washington 102 891 

New York 1 is I In 

Pittsburg 

Pittsburg 185 515 

Louisville 21 

New York 

St. Louis 

W,\- N ork 21 66 

St. I is and Philadcl] i ia 81 88! 

Washington 

27 102 

New York I HI 891 

Baltimore 

Chicago 24 91 

Cleveland 121 521 

i in- e 100 -113 

Pittsburg 56 207 

Cincinnati 39 122 

New York and Louisville.. . 119 405 

i in. innati M 3*0 

Brooklyn 42 14f 

Philadelphia and St. Louis.. 15 52 

Baltimore 88 188 

St. Louis and Philadelphi 

Cleveland Ill II 

Pittsburg 

Washington 78808 

42 111 

Baltimore 71 284 

Philadelphia 8884C 

■ n 76 288 

Philadelphii 78282 

Iphia 

Philadelphia 71 871 

Pittsburg II 132 

Baltimore 861*3 

Cleveland 81 11 



'I 391 II 

Iphia 87185 

Philadelphia 40;i(!3 

Louisville 

i. .u 

Philadelphia and St. I ,ui I. 112 181 

New York II III 







48 109 
82 66 

13 
86144 
ss U8 
21 5(1 
15 83 
69 P.'i 



Oil 
89 
II 
81 

01 

in 
in 
si 
88 

1)0 

71 
7". 
87 
7i l 
111 
86 
80 
28 
28 
:!l 
II 
n 
31 
Ins 
85 
80 . 
16 



.281 

. 286 
. 28i 
. 28 1 
.284 
. 28 1 
.28 
.282 
.881 

.'.N.I 

.280 
.278 
21 7 

'.me 

;;.'. 

.'. i 
■;; i 
;.'i I 

■;;i 

273 
273 
21 1 ' 



M 

'r- 

168 
29 

'.'III 

lull 
is,', 
111 

150 
161 

1st, 
186 

21 

I.'. 

131 

18 

136 

1 28 

31 
128 

is 
30 
201 

I is 
00 



.270 .10 
.270 173 
.269 

.'.•on 
.'.'00 

'.'.is 
'.'li. 

.261 

.'.'Hi' 
.264 
.264 
.264 

.201 

.'.'01 



is 
12 
96 

II 

ii'.' 
nt: 
51 

o; 

128 

83 

.2581118 

80 

42 

40 
89 

31 
311 
I.'. 

87 

Is 

I '.'I 

III 



n 
to 

27 

21) 
I'.i 
II 
82 
K 
17 
12 
18 
2 
4 
II 

7 
10 
1 
» 
7 

is 
II 

8 

4 
12 
.".i. 




10 

3 
10 

I 
10 

4 

II 
II 

3 

■I 

1 



217 101 
210 19 



2 
9 

12 17 
2 
5 
2 






go 



I \l. AVERAGES. 

i. \ i i inc rei i ads — Continued. 






Hart.... 
i Daub.. 

i P i. 

ss O'Brien. 
89 Nance. 



I Cunningham 

- Clements. . . . 



I ( Yeager 

Burrill 

' ' , Holler 

92 Griffith 



,.., i FifieW 

■'■' i Donahue.... 

',H Magee 

useman., . 
86 I Clingman . . . 
I PfefTcr. 



06 



W 
88 
89 
100 

101 

103 
108 

101 
108 

10C 



i 



Connor.. 

Dunn 

Swain 

McAleer . . . 

(Wilson... 

I Canavan . 
Sugden 

I Young. .. . 

Kops 

i Hawley . ■ 

llirt:! ...... 

107 McAllister.. 

106 Dolan 

mith... 

as 

1 1 1 Wheeler.... 
trie 

■;I1 

■■r 

118 Kittridgc... 


I ►< .nnelly. ■ ■ 
Murphy. . . 

Fr.izer 

Rhines 

Hoek 

Mcjamcs. . . 
Gardner. . . . 
j Cuppy.... 
I Rogers. . . 
Hughey. . . . 
Hill........ 



118 
1 19 

120 
131 
12-2 
128 
124 

12.1 



136 

1 



I 



St. Louis 43 15.-, 

lirooklyn 18 45 

Baltimore 31 90 

Washington 84 318 

Louisville 

Louisville 30 96 

Philadelphia B 184 

Boston 

lirooklyn 31 105 

Baltimore 41 148 

Chicago 40 161 

Philadelphia 21 ',', 

Chicago 53188 

Louisville 20 60 

St. Louis 78 

Louisville 115 106 

Chicago 82118 

Cleveland 88 189 

St. Louis 22 83 

84 127 

igton 21 71 

nd 83 89 

Cleveland 35 11', 

.-.. 63239 

88 288 

sd IB 156 

le 

Baltimore 28 92 

St. Louis II IBS 

Pittsburg 36 125 

Cincinnati 27 66 

nd 10131 

lie 

lirooklyn 113 180 

■ 86 131 

' i , 

20 74 
28 '.Hi 
is 60 
77 268 
i- :,; 

21 79 

36 116 

15 19 

II 12! 

i; M 



New York 

Cleveland 

Brooklyn 

I '^tOll 

Chicago 

turg and New York. . 



iile 

( in, innati 

Louisville 

Washington 

i g 

Cleveland 

Louisville 



Pittsburi 
.onisvil 



L 



ii 
ii 

15 
81 
85 
13 
18 
91 ' 
15 
20 
29 
II 
29 

4 

82 
60 
in 
18 
18 
19 

7 

5 
16 
25 
.■in 68 
16 HI 
16 84 

1 •:• 



11 


82 


,216 


10 •;; 


216 


6 11 






.211 


10 28 




i; 89 


.20! 




.206 


ii in 


.205 


R 


15 




1" 


20 




II 


12 


,206 


86 


.v.' 


,198 


8 


11 


.198 


6 


18 


.190 


40 


16 


.187 


12 






16 


20 


.172 


4 


17 


.160 


I 


s 




IS 


20 


160 


18 


12 


,158 


6 


S 


148 


21 


82 


lis 


1 


- 


116 


.» 


, 


.098 



26 

I! 
28 

28 
,- 
77 
43 
218 101 
.217 86 



8 

1 



» 





OFFICIAL W TRACKS. 



91 



FIELDING RECORD, 1897. 



FIRST BASEMEN. 



Name. 



Tebeau 

Douglas 

Vaughn 

J Decker 

I Tcnney 

W. Clarke. 
-(Boyle 

( Anson 

I Lyons 

IWerden... 
) Lajoie 

) Connor 

' PConaer. . . . 

fucker 

LaChance . . . . 

1 Roth fuss. . . 

j Doyle 

1 Beck ley. . . . 

Grady 

Davis 

Carlwright. . . 



Club. 



Cleveland 

St. Louis 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

Boston. 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

Pittsburg 

Louisville 

Philadelphia 

St. Louis 

Cleveland 

Boston and Washington., . 

Brooklyn 

Pittsburg 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore 

Cincinnati and New York. 
Philadelphia and St. Louis. 

Pittsburg 

Washington 



u 


O 


1/1 




u 

W 


V 



_. c 

re n 


91 


9 k! 


49 


6 


959 


i; 


Hi; 


7 


1 


154 


ss 


34'J 


i; 


4 


863 


38 


398 


28 


5 


431 


128 1289 


79 


If. 


1834 


lin I06B 


m 


15 


11 46 


2tS 


21V 





3 


226 


l.'l 


Slid 


23 


13 


B76 


HI 


320 


17 


5 


848 


134 


1339 


121 


23 


1 188 


108 


[070 


37 


is 


1126 


22 


237 


11 


■1 


25*! 


33 3111 


9 


C. 


; ■• 


98 904 


III 1, 


Off, 


125 1280 


i;:; ■.'') 




so ail 


11 


:, 


847 


11 inn'; 


75 


25 


r.'ii-.' 


251 *03 


9 


5 


211 


114 994 


58123 


107". 


si 805 


50 28 


877 


62 5(14 


27 B0 


611 


3:1 


291 


25 


11 


327 



.998 

.'.IS! I 
,<>SN 

988 

us; 

9K7 

986 
988 

984 

'JK I 

983 

981 
979 

979 

977 
977 
.975 
967 
966 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



I Cross. . . . 



H 



2 Reitz. 

8l Smith 

•ITebcau 

6, Corcoran 



Lowe 

DeMomrcville. 

Chllds 

^ Connor 

1 Padden 

Hallman 

Shoch 

O'Brien 

Houseman 

Gleason 

Callahan 

Rogers 

Canavan 

Dolan . 

Dovvil . 

Pfeffer 

Johnson 



1 Cincinnati 

Philadelphia 

Baltimore 

Louisville 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

Philadelphia 

Boston 

Washing! ju 

Cleveland 

Chicago . . 

Pittsburg 

Phila. and St. Louis 

Brooklyn 

Washington 

St. Louis 

New York 



lie 

Brooklyn 

Brooklyn 

St. Louis and Phila. . 

Chicago 

Louisville 



SI 




269 


i; 


101 


1! 


71 


1 '.•:, 


7 


2113 


125 


8flS 


448 


■j; 


. 


21 


47 


59 


1 


110 


17 


34 


53 


4 


91 


4 1 


125 148 


IS 


280 


37 


811,120 


111 




121 


272 104 


:b 


709 


81 


BO 


M 


HI 


188 


114 


822 


886 


12 


750 


77 


179 




503 




■:. ' 


889 11 


818 


11(1 


288 


387 89 


059 


65 


185 


■.>:;•.' ■<.: 


4(1 


si 


229 250;S3 


518 


M 


93 117,10 


286 


181 


800 108 56 


765 


B0 


OS 90 14 




87 


83 122 18 


888 


K.'i 


154 




358 


18 


43 


OS, 12 


188 


28 


57 




III 


B9 


72 


01 81 




88 


72 


93 


23 


187l 



.965 

.964 
,068 

.955 
.954 

.1(17 
.'.HI 
,948 
.948 
.941 
.989 

.929 
.927 

M 
.919 

.IKK. 

908 

.805 
R8H 



92 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 
THIRD BASEMEN. 



Name. 



Quinn 

Clingman. . . 

Irwin 

Wallace 

Collins 

Nash 

Riley 

Donnelly. . ., 

Shindle 

McGraw 

Cross 

Everett 

McCormick . 
Hartman. .. . 
Davis 

oyce 

Vngiey 

Hoffrneisier. 



I 



Baltimore 

I ."iiisvillc 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Washington 

mrg and New York. 

Brooklyn 

Baltimore 

Philadelphia 



Chicago 

St. Louis 

Pittsburg 

New York 

Washington 

Pil tsburg 



c 


•■/. 
< 


o 

u 


« « 


a 

V 

u 

V 


40 


«•! 


i; 


I2fl 


1)62 


175 2! 


-:i 


474 


949 




♦47 


989 


194 255 :u 


480 


MA 


218 308 SB 


55 1 


.981 


I!:", I!.", 28 


288 


919 


1 ( ; 228 85 


410 


.1111 


70 12] I'.i 210 


'.« i'.i 


179 '<MK ir, 


178 


v,i.-, 


116 1«»', 


88 1 


.892 


<r> 




in 


.888 


125 


1 lU 87 


.-a 8 


.ST'.I 


56 


11,* 26 


illMI 


.870 


162 


258 6 1 


179 866 


55 


59118 


182 .868 


161 


200 60 


427 .861 


Si 


67 in 


122 .852 


50 


68 28 


1 161.808 



SHORTSTOPS. 



?iuiun 
eniiing^ 

G. Davis 

Dahlen 

Ely. 

LVfcKean 

< ori i >ran 



G. Smith 

\ Allen 

(Nash 

I-""k r 

rmick. . 

I Kir- hie 

ISGillen 

i i ntreville., 

j Wrijiley 

.-I 

Shu^art 

I )olan 

Callahan 



Baltimore 

Baltimore 

New York 

Chicago 

urg 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

St. Louis 

yn 

Boston 

Philadelphia 



Cincinnati 

Philadelphia 

Washington 

Washington 

Louisville and New York. 

Philadelphia 

I ."iii-.'. ille 

< Chicago 



•.'1 


r,l 


.-,.* 


I 


128 


II.-, 


tm 


117 


.-,( 


HOT 


131 


846 


I3li 


57 


s.'l'.i 


75 


216 


297 


89 


551 


]:::; 


806 


160 


i;n 


s-;i, 


YK 


281 


381 


.-,ii 


662 


64 


164 211 


81 




180 




■ i 






5H 


678 


82 


-ii i i. 


IK 


218 


in 


:,l 


:,i 


I" 


112 






::!, 


68 




4.-, 


110 


182 


80 




li'.i 


146 


•;ni 


In 


::: i 


so 


181 


I9H 


89 


368 


101 


262 


359 


79 


700 


II 


;n U2 


-.'I 


206 


11 Hi 


210864 


76 


650 


4u 


108 180 


88 


266 


is 


■in, ,-,(i 


16 106 


in 


24 54 


IB 98 



.'.Kir 
988 
.932 
.929 
.827 
.924 
,928 
.921 
nil 
.910 
'.mi 
.908 
697 
K!I7 
894 
887 

SMI 

B88 

876 
.849 

. S88 



OUTFIELDER i. 



Nance 

Blake 

Brodie 

Keeler 

Dclchanty. 
Octlman. . 

j Lajoic.. . 

I Cooley . 
Duffy 



l.ouisvil le. ... 
Cleveland . . . . 
Pittsburg . . . 

Philad 

'i^ton. . 
Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia. 

1 Boston 



34 


60 


N 


" 


I'.K 


81 


si; 


8 


1 


'.HI 




216 


II 


1 






218 


14 


i 




128 


262 


22 


I" 


-.-.'I 


■■;: 


I'.i 




2 


.'.I 


IK 


12 6 


■ I 




129 


826 15 


u 




127 


263 


12 


12 


287 



1.IHH) 

.988 
.988 
,970 
964 

.'.'03 
.960 
.WO 
.958 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 

OUTFIELDERS — Continual. 



93 



Namh. 



( Houseman. . . 

■'Griffin 

' Selbach 

Kelley 

\ Hamilton . . . . 

) Abbey 

Lange 

ran. ... 

/ Jones 

McAleer 

Douglas 

Burkett 

' ('Conner 

Tiernan 

! Burke 

1 Ryan 

r 

S|i\eltS 

Hoy 

Stahl 

I Van llaltren.. 

' * Seler 

t Pickering 

I Holliday 

Miller 

Stenzel 

Wriglcy 

/Clark 

(Brown 

<n 

J Decker 

I Warner 

McAllister 

Harley 

i !•'.. E. Smith.. 

i Dowd 

Tannehill 

Leahy 

I lolme* 

Ritchie 

I. ally 

u 

McCreery 

A. Smith 

Dexter 

Callahan 

Thornton 



Club. 



St. Louis 

Brooklyn 

Washington 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Washington 

Chicago 

Pittsburg 

Brooklyn 

Cleveland 

«-t. Louis 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

\< u- York 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

st. 1.. mis 

! I I ■-. I 1 > 1 1 

nati 

Boston 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Clevelandand Louisville. 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

altimore 

Washington 

i i ! ■-• 

Washington 

Brooklyn 



Louisville 

< lleveland 

St. 1. Mills 

Pittsburg 

I ouisand Philadelphia 

Pittsburg 

W'hingtoii and Pin 

N'-w York and Louisville. 

Cincinnati 

1 uis 

Cleveland 

Louisville and New York. 

Brooklyn 

I onisville 

o 



mi 
81 

804 
286 

m 

I '.•>• 
.,,,, 

186 

283 

61 

70 

220 

!|- 

180 
293 

211 
147 

1:1 
352 
Hill 
268 

78 

841 
0' 

.'u: 

a-s 
a 

283 

252 
256 
US 

ion 

40 

189 

240 

178 
80 
85 

[90 
29 

198 

II 

198 
81 
37 
89 
;« 



5 
18 

II 
la 
9 

I I 
17 

16 II 
•il 1 1 

3 1 8 

1414 

:i f, 
14 12 

II 15 

^s || 
10,10 
4 3 
II -it 
is 18 



68 
882 
888 
265 

:: .':; 
Illi 

2aa 

•.'I'.' 

268 
57 

III 
■_'i-. 
104 
200 

\!.M 

■.':,:! 
lOi 

all 

887 
'.'no 
820 

111 
288 

70 
28i 
202 

56 

.880 

291 

284 

133 



.955 
.955 
955 
.964 
.958 
.968 
.052 
.'.us 
.Ids 
.1117 
III.", 
in:: 
.942 

1111 

.Hill 

.inn 
.940 

.Hill 

,988 
.985 

Ho I 
.'.III I 

,938 
.938 
,982 
.931 

.987 
.927 
.920 

1117 



183 .917 



.Illi 

.III IS 

.mis 
.906 
.906 
.909 
.895 

.sua 

,887 
.878 
.879 

.saw 

.S.'|,l 

,756 



*m 



■an 



94 



OFFICIAL AVERAGES. 
CATl HERS' RECORDS. 



Name. 



Peitz 

Kittridge.. . 
Ziminer. . . . 

Murphy 

Clements... 

Schriver 

Farrell 

Warner .... 

Boyle 

B .... 

M. i roire . . - 

Cv i ;."' 

Clarke 

I Sugden. . . 

| Merritt. . . 
Donohue. .. 

(ianzel 

Grim 

Don-las. . . . 
Lake 

Wilson 

Bowerman. 

Iluiril! 

A. Smith.. . 
Dexter 






Cincinnati 



Cleveland 

St. Louis 

:lphia 

Cincinnati 

[tun 

■ rtc 

Philadelphia 



Baltimore 

Cleveland 

Baltimore 

Pittsburg 

Pittsburg 





a 

St. Louis 

Boston 

llle 

St. Louis and Philadelphia 

V.u- York 

Baltimore 

lyn 

Ivn 

Louisville 



72 258 
311 
81 i76 

51 Co- 
ls 104 

52 n; 

6 1 222 

110 521 

is 151 

r, is.-, 

38 l:.M 
59 101 

! I 

20 102 
ro •:::; 
61 101) 
10 49 

88 154 

il i 



79 ia 

B8 1 1 



46 9 
62 15 
ss 19 
SB B 
46 12 
88 15 

S | -jo 

18 I I 

72 18 

20 10 

II If 

69 15 

; i 16 
10 



840 
112 

MSI 
51217 

6 885 

211 
MB 

107 
101289 

2 181 

I 248 

18 122 

■.'i'ii 
816 

111 
:;;:: 
26 1 

CI 



8(1 



a ia; 

20 811 
I 115 
9 ITS 

in in 



.954 
.960 

.Ills 

II 111 

.984 
.980 
.929 

.928 
926 
.926 
.924 

. Iix'8 

.iiir 

.917 
914 

.I I!S 
lill 
.1111 

>:s 

.s-'.i 
F86 

Fro 

S.-S 

.862 

Ml 

,F29 



PITCHERS' RECORDS IN ALPHABETICAL 01 













6 1 *j 




'/ 










Z 


1 




1 - 

no. 


~r ~ 


?! 

s 1- 






r 


c a. 






c- 


0> 


"pto 


■'■£ 






S:z 




■-< 


Kami-. 


Club. 


1/1 
V 

B 

ft 


a 

V 

u 


£2 
Ut3 


5 
as 

> 


c2 
> 


- 


m 


1 

c 


Is 

to 






— 


2. 


< 


< 


X 


n 


* 


z. 




nati. — .... 


::i ,7'is 


271 1.76 


■ 


- 


fo 




.982 


!■ 


[O 


■M .210 


.824 B.20'8 I" 




B'» 


62 


.868 




-,'l ,671 


.800 ."1 1.14 


H 


E6 


52 


.842 




Louisville 






" 






"1 


Cupuy 


laud 


i; .5fifl 


hi 1 58 


5 


'.'.1 


28 


948 






.262 1 R6 1 71 




106 
58 


151 

1:1 


',11 




I.ouis. 


.:■ 


.400 


.318 


6.86 




.800 



* Exclusive of lie game*. 



.OFFICIAL A\ ERAGES, 



95 



PITCHERS' RECORDS — < t*fi tin ufd. 



Name. 



Donotitte. . . 
Dwyer 

1 )unn 

Daub 

Ehret 

Fisher 

Eraser 

Ei field 

Friend. ■ - ■ ■ 

Gri fith 

rlawley . - - 
Kughey — 
Hart 

nil! 

Holier 

Kitten 

King 

Kennedy. . . 

kl.ilr.nl. til/ 

Lewis 

Meekta 

M agee 

Mei cer . . .. 
Mcjaines. . . 



Nli h Is 

Ortli ■ 

P veil 



Payne 

Rhine 
Rusie 

. 
Sullivan 

in 

Stivetts ... 

■ Iiill .. 

Thornton . . 
i v lor 

W I.T... 

Wilson.... 

Yonn^ .... 



< i ■ B, 



St. Louis 

Cincinnati 

Brooklyn 

Brooklyn 

Cincinnati 

Brooklyn 

Louisville 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 

< Chicago 

Pittsburg 

Pittsburg 

m. Lottjs 

Louisville 

Baltimi n i 

Pittsburg 

Wash in \ i 

Brooklyn 

Boston 



rk 

Louisville 

Washin 

[ton . . . . 
B iltimore 



Philadelpl ia., .. 

Cleveland 

Baltimore 

Brooklyn 

nati 

Vew York 

Mew York 

►rk 

ingtoii — 

Boston 

1'ii tsburg 

. 
. riphia — 
tnd ...... 

Clevclrui'l 



o»fi 



u 



■ 

638 
,858 

138 
600 

HI 

gg 

.800 

. I. Ml 

,248 
.291 
691 
. 161 
.412 
IS 
.728 
.645 

.850 
.64 

.789 

,419 
.648 

.784 

.800 

555 
860 

588 

! 
170 



884 
::n:i 
883 
819 
.818 
2* 
.288 
.810 
.289 
.296 

ggg 

.811 
880 
265 
.290 
.29] 
,808 
.284 
.291 
278 

a e 

.290 
272 



07 
4.28 
8.85 
8.88 

6.04 
6.00 
6.05 
6.04 

5. 95 

6.11 

6.16 

7.7(1 

5.1 

5.85 

5.80 

6.64 

5.12 

5.84 

5.8 

I 91 
5.18 
8.86 I 
8.80 I 

1.28 1 

1.98 1 
B.482 
1.80 I 
.858 8.89 1 
.241 1.84 ! 
.812 6.47 2 
,811 8.108 
,288 1.66 ■■ 

,294 5.692 
.898 5.65 8 
.8926 86 8 
298 6.07 '.' 
.290 1.85:2 







,/ 














ed 




Oil 






= « 


i- 


= 


> « 




3 


-- 




- 


















X 


(0 


■III 


18 


1(1(1 


79 


11 


47 


6f 


ID 


68 


.IF 


!l 


47 


,i 1 


12 


87 


B7 


1 


40 


.84 


84 


141 


.61 R 


88 


.30 


i:i 


HI 


66 


ik 86 


.78 


■j:, 88 


.Mi 


'. 16 


.51 


11 1 19 


.84 


2fl 


70 


64 


l.-i 


m 


.7(1 


>.) 


72 


.88 


» 


42 


.1(1 


K 146 


.84 


24 128 


85 


Hi 128 


.17 


3 100 


.71 


11 96 




2! 1 B 


At 




.81 


li 50 


Bfi 


8 


52 


81 


5 


76 


^ 


li 


66 


OS 


13 


-■_' 




19 


7ii 


91 


IK 


M 


v; 


1" 


m 


2f 


I'.l 


165 


,9E 


II 
III 


,1 
64 


12 




41 


kk 


K 


21 


.81 


.' 


60 


.68 


•■''> 


78 


.04 


8 


76 


.89 


:i 


MJ 


26 


K 


61 



.3 u 



III 

26 
in 
89 
81 
74 
82 

106 
84 
II 
65 
57 
68 
99 
.•in 

Kll 

98 
62 

Kl 

88 
98 

161 
66 

136 
17 
61 
58 
B! 
69 



K77 
.827 
.864 

.IH7 
.1164 
.765 
.£84 
.946 
,881 
,906 
.771 
.837 
. -i ■■:, 
.868 
,818 

.KM 

,916 
1 828 

>l(i 

.1.-.K 

:708 

.7;;, 
.784 

.Kill 

.878 
.908 
•888 

.Kill 
.Kill 

.886 



10 .kii 



IK 
K 

n; 

88 

.>. 
85 

'., 
88 

,i 



:m 

.778 
iTS6 
.v:.:i 
.;u -j 
.Kir. 
.788 
,K06 
.888 
.889 



* Exclusive of tie games. 



1 



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OFFICE OP PRESIDENT 

NATIONAL LEAGUE and AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



fit JfOUKC MM 



W'- 



ty&gy^ZC &JIAK £f /MS 



















Spalding's 

Trade = Mark 

Base Balls. 

The Spalding League Bal 1 
adopted by the National League 
and American Association of 
Professional Base Ball Clubs. 
Warranted to last a full game 
without ripping or losing us 

elasticity or shape. 

Each. 



No. J . The Spalding Official League Ball . . .$ | .50 
No. | B. The Spalding Official Boys' League 

Ball, for Junior Clubs | .00 

No. 0« "Double Scam 11 Ball, double stitched 

and warranted to last a full game | .50 

No. X. 1 lie Spalding "Commercial League," 

regulation size, warranted | ,00 

No. 2- " Professional" Ball, regulation size 

and weight, warranted a first-class ball 75 

No. 2B, " Hoys' Professional," same as No. 2, 

in boys* size 35 

No. 3. "Amateur" Ball, regulation size, 

horschide cover 50 

No. 5. " King of the Diamond." regulation 

size and well made , 35 

No. 7, " Boys' Favorite," regulation size, 

horschide cover »25 

No. 7B. " League Junior," slightly under 

regulation size, horschide cover 25 

No. |0- "High Flyer," a very lively ball 25 

No. g. "Victor" Ball, regulation size 20 

No. |4. " Boys' Amateur" Ball, little under 

regulation size .15 

(All of the above in separate box and sealed.) 
No. 8. "Eureka" Ball, nearly regulation 

size 10 

No. 93. " Boys' Lively" Ball, high bounder.. . IO 

No. |3. "Rocket" Ball, the best made 05 

No.'|5. " Dandy" Ball, two-piece cover 05 

No. |6- "Boss" Ball, four-piece cover .05 



new york A. G. SPALDING & BROS. Chicago 







Spalding's Trademark Bats. 

fue Model, made of finest selected 
1 fit) t*fa m s9 timber, oil finish, and in various models. 
No. A I . J5. Q IpOi(lw& Each bat in separate bag. Length i 

*£—C^l""^ »4, 85 and 3b* inches. Highest quality. 
Each 75C - 

No 3'0, Spalding's Black End Wagon Tongue Ash Bat, League 
quality. Handle roughened by uur patented process for better grip. 

Each, 50c. 

^*°- OX. Spalding's Black End "Axletree" Bat, finest straight grained 
ash, improved models Each, 25c» 

No. 2X. 

No. 2X. Spalding's Black End "Antique 1 * Finish Bat, extra quality 
a*h Each, 20c. 

No. 4. Spalding's Black End Willow Bat, highly finished and | 

and th t light wood bat made Each, 25C. 

Spalding's Trade=Mark Boys' Bats. 

fc-. .. ■ f 

N»- 3X. Spalding Junior, extra quality ash ; lengths, 30 an. 1 88 in. hes. 

Each, 25C. 

No. 2XB. Spaldlng'« Black End Antique Bat, selected ash; 
31 inches Each, | Oc. 

No. |0. Spaldin i Boys' Ash Bat ; length, 26 inches. 

Each, 5c. 

new york A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. Chicago 




No. 0/4. 




No. 3/0. 




No. OX. 




No.0. 




No. C. 



Spalding's Masks. 

Black Enameled Sun Protecting Mask. 

Patented. 

s\t */t) *1**4 Thia is not only the 

Tmffiffiflffldt "Hi^he^t Quality" Mask 

N i. 4/0. (X? Jf\!^r *\f* made by us, but hai 
y^/^w ^ ^ pur patent sunshadt 

^^ mk ^^ is Formed by a p 
molded leather securely fastened to b p, farming a per- 
fect shade to the eye without obstructing the view or 
materially increasing the weight of the mask. 
of be tied steel wire, extra heavy and black 
enameled, thus further preventing the reflection of 
light. The mask throughout is constructed of the 
best material and has been highly endorsed by 
the lea ers Each, $5.06 

Spalding's Black Enameled Masks. 

No. 3'Q. ^ lir Patent Neck Protecting Mask has an 
extension at bottom giving absolute protection to the 
neck, without interfering in the least with the move- 
menta oi the head. The wire is of best annealed steel, 
is extra heavy and covered witl name! to pre- 

atthe refl© ti< f light. The padding is filled with 

hair and faced with finest imported dog! 
which, being impervious to , . always re- 
mains soft and pleasant to the face Each, $4.00 

No. 2-'0. Sp i 1 ! rue Mask, made of extra h 
and best soil annealed steel wire, blw k enameled, 
padding filled with goat hair and covered with finest 
imported dogskin Each, $3.00 

No. O^X. Regulation League Mask, made of heavy 
soft annealed steel wire, black enameled, the padding 
well stuffed an 1 fai ed with specially tanned ; 
Warranted first-class and reliable in every particular. 

$2.50 
Regulation League Masks. 

No. O. This mass: i i of lualtty as our 

No. OX mask, except that the soft annealed steel wire 
is bri ding is well stuffed and 

faced with specially tanned borsehidcEach, $2. CO 

Spalding's Amateur Masks. 

No. A. Spalding's Amateur Mask, made in same 

andgenei I as out League masks, but of lighter 

soft ! ! teel wire, well padded, strongly coi 

structedand warranted perfectly safe. ..Each, $ | ,50 

No. B. Spalding's Amateur Boys' Mask, made in same 

l Etna quality as our No. A mask, only smaller in 

i ii boys Kach,$fl.OO 

No. L, Spalding's Men's Mask, heavy wire, well 
padded Each, $ | .00 

No. C. Spalding's Youths 1 Masks, heavy wire and well 

bout head or chin piece Each, 75C. 

No. D, Spalding's Youths* Masks, light wire and pad- 
ded, with >Ut lici I ( r (bin piece Each, 50C. 

No. E. Spa! 'Masks, light wire and padi 
without 1 piece Each, 25c. 



new york A. G. SPALDING & BROS. Chicago 






Spalding's Catchers' Mits. 

All of our Mits arc furnished for either the Right or Left Hand. The 
Left Hand Mit always sent unless otherwise ordered. No Throwing 
Glove furnished with any of our Mits. 

Baseman's .Mit. 

. o /jt) Jtfi— A This Mit, hearing 

No. 7/CX MGllMWttP ,he Trade-Mark of 

(tfJf -•»"*"•■" J our"Highest Qual- 
K ~^ f C -* ^ ity" goods, is suffi- 
cient guarantee that it is the most perfect glove 
in all its details that our past experience en- 
ables us to produce. The leather is of the finest 
quality, specially tanned for that purpose, the 
padding and workmanship of the very best, 
and the additional feature of lace back make 
it — as we intend it shall be — the "Perfeci i 
of Catchers' Mits. Made in Rights and 
Lefts Each, $7.50 



No. 5/0. Spalding's League Mit is made 
throughout of specially tanned and selected 
buckskin, making it an extra strong and dur- 
able mit, at the same time being very soft and 
pliable. It has our patent Lace Back and 
heavily padded. Made in Rights and Lefts. 
Each, $5.00 





No. OX. 



No. O* The Spalding Mit, face, sides and finger- 
piece are made of velvet tanned deerskin, and 
the back of selected asbestos buck, making an 

exceedingly easy-fitting and durable mit. It 
has our patent Lace Back and well padded. 
Made to Rights and Lefts Each, $2.50 



No. OX. Spalding's "Decker Patent " Mit is 
made exactly the same as our No. Mit, soft 
tanned deerskin, with the addition of a heavy 
piece of sole leather on back for extra protec- 
tion to the hand and fingers, as shown in cut. 
It has us well the patent Lace Back, and is ex- 
tremely well padded. Made in Rights and 
Lefts Each, $3, CO 




No. A. Spalding's Amateur Mit is made of extra 
quality asbestos buck, perspiration proof and 
extremely tough and durable. It has our 
put -Mit lace Back, reinforced at thumb and well 
made and padded. Made in Rights and Lefts. 

$2.00 



No. A. 



No 3. The Spalding Practice Mit is made of 
soft tanned leather, well finished throughout 

and substantially padded. Made in High',* 
and Lefts Each, $ | .00 



new york A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. Chicago 




Spalding's Boys' Catchers' Mits. 

No. OXB. Spalding's "Decker Patent" Boys' 
League Mit, face, edge strip and finger*piei 
of velvet tanned deerskin, very soft and perspira- 
tion proof. The heavy piece of sole leather o;i 
baclc affords extra protection to hand and fingers. 
It lias the patent Lace Back and is extra well pad- 
ded. Made in Rights and Lefts Each, $2. CO 

No. 2. Spalding's Hoys' Mit, face and finger-piece 
■ i mit made of drab tanned buckskin, the back of 
lighter and the edge-strip of darker tanned leather. 
It has our patent Lace Back, well padded and fin- 
ished and reinforced at thumb. Made in Rights 
and Lefts, and little larger in size than our ■ 
Boys' Mits Each, $ | .50 

No. 4. Spalding's Boys' Mit is made of soft tanned 
suede leather. It is extremely well padded and 
v finished throughout. Made in Rights and 
Lefts Each, 50C. 

No. 5. Spalding's Boys' Mit, all leather, soft and 
durable. Well made throughout, heavily padded 
and superior to any Boys' Mit ever offered at the 
price Each, 25C. 

No. ©. Boys' Mit, leather face, canvas back, well 
y "--'- padded Each, | 5c. 

No, 7. Boys' Mil, all canvas Each, | OC- 




Spalding's Basemen's Mit. 




BX. 




No. 1 



Basemen's Mit, made 
of fine selected and 
special 1;. 
skin, extremely 
made throughout, mid 
d to meet the special requirements 
in. hi's Mii. It adapts itself nicely to the can! 

, i the hand without undue straining, and the 
addition of our patent I. ace Back and" Hi 
Quality " Trade Mark la a sufficient guaran 
ii a Quality and merits. Madeiu Ki^hts and Lefts. 

Each, $4.C0 



Spalding's 
Basemen's and Infielders' Mits. 





No. ax. 



Mil, made of the very 

■ light 
tanned buckskin, the 
thumb and at wrist is 
extra well padded with 
the highest quality felt, making it a vt.-ry sal 

'■.■ mbined with strength and dura- 

I be mit throughout Is I work- 

u d by our " High* si Quality " 

Trade Mark. Made iu Rights and Lefts. .$3.00 



new york A. G. SPALDING & BROS, chicaoo 




Spalding's 
Basemen's and Infielders' 



Mits. 




No. 4X. 



No. 4X. Spalding's Basemen's and Infielders' Mit 
is made throughout of velvet tanned deerskin and 

edges nicely bound. Tt is well padded with fine 
felt and carefully sewed and finished. Made in 
Rights and Lefts Each, $2.00 

No. 5X. Spa) '■ i semen's and Infielders' Mit, 
made of good quality leather, extra well pad- 
ded and constructed throughout in a most substan- 
tial manner: an exceedingly good mit at a populai 

. .Made in Rights and Lefts. ..Each, $ | .QO 




No. BX. 




No. 2X. 







Boys' Basemen's and Infielders' Mits. 

No. 6X- Spalding's Roys' Basemen's Mit IS made 
throughout of a good quality leather. t It ; 
padded and makes a good and substantial mit for 
boys. Made in Rights and Lefts Each, 50C. 

Infielders* Gloves. 

Infielders 1 Glove is 
made througl 
specially tanned buck- 

skin, lined and cor- 
rectly padded w i t h 
It fits the hand perfectly and our Trade 
Marie " Quality " is a guarantee th I 

is perfect in all its details. Made in Rights 
and Lefts Each, $3.00 

No. X . Spalding's Infielders' Glove, m ;■■ 

•;1 leather, ■■ and carefully 

put together. Made in Rights and Letts. $ J ,50 

No. |5. Spalding's Men's Infielders' Glove, all 
leather; a substantial glove at a popular price. 

$ 1 .00 

No. |6. Spalding's Men's Infielders' Glove, all 
leather Each, 50C. 

Boys' Infielders' Gloves. 

No. |3. Spalding's Hoys' Infielders' Glove, selected 
leather, felt paaded, quality and style as our No. 
X, in boys' sizes Each, $ | ,00 

No- 17. Spalding's Boys' Infielders' GloVi 
leather Each,25C. 

Pitchers* Toe Plates. 

Worn on toe of shoe and made for left or right 
foot. A valuable assistant in pitching. 

Aluminum Toe Plate Each, 50c. 

4 25c 



No. 2X. 




No. X. 




No. A. 

No. B. Brass Toe Plate. 



new york A. G. SPALDING & BROS. Chicago 



Spalding's Bases. 

Three Bases to a Set. Per Set. 

No. Oi League Clu tra quality can- 

i-rl quilted, Straps and spikes, complete. . .$8.00 

No. I, Canvas Bases, good quality canvas, not 

No. 0. quilled, straps and spikes, complete 6.00 

No. 2i Canvas liases, ordinary quality, whli 

straps and spikes, complete. . 4.00 

Home Plates not included in a 1 ovc sets, 

Spalding's Home Plates. Each . 

No. 1. No. I, Rubber Home Plate, complete $7.50 

No. 2. Marble Home Plate, best quality 2.0O 

Spalding's Pitcher's Box Plates. 

e in accordance with National League regulations 
and of extra quality white rubber. Complete with pins. 

No. 3. No. 3, Spalding's Pitcher's Box Plates. Each, $6,00 

Spalding's Club Bags. 





No. 1. 
No. 2. 



Canvas Club Bag, leather ends, for 24 bats.. 
Canvas Club Bag, leather ends, for 12 bats.. 



Individual Bags. 



a 



Each. 
■$5.00 
• 4.O0 



No. OI. 

No. 02. 
No. 03. 



IBM 

t*.. 

•am mm 



No. 02. 

Sole Leather Bag, for two bats 

Heavy Canvas Bag, leather reinforce al both ends... 
Canvas Bag, leather reinforce at one end 

Score Books. 

CLUB SIZES. 

I cover, 80 games. . .. 

Cloth " 00 " .... 

Cloth " 90 '• .... 

Cloth " 120 " .... 

^flfe I PJCKET SIZES. 

f v. . /■) No. I. Paper cover, 7 games 

^*2^ N . 2. Board " 22 " 

" 1 " 



No 


4. 




5. 


No 


e. 




7. 


N 


1. 


N 


2. 


No 


3 



Each. 
$4.00 
. 1. 50 

I.OO 

Each. 
SI. OO 
1.75 
2.50 
3.0O 

.IO 
.25 
.50 



new york A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. Chicago 



•Macaaj^^H 






SPALDING'S 

BASE BALL 5H0E5. 




X..2/0. 
Our "Highest Quality" Base Ball Shoe is hand-made through- 
out, ami oi specially selected kangaroo leather. Extreme care 
will be taken in their general construction, and no pains or ex- 
pense will be spared in making this shoe not only of the very 
highest in quality but a perfect shoe in every detail. The plates, 
made exclusively for this shoe, are of the finest hand-forged 
steel, and firmly riveted to heel and sole. 

V. 2/0. Per Pair, $7.50. 
SPRINTING. . . 

Same quality as our No. 2/0 uilt on our famous 

running shoe last, Wei aces to the pair, and 

made with extra care throughout. 

No. 30S. Pel lair, $ I O.OO. 

CLUB SPECIAL. . . 

Made of carefully attn calfskin, machine sewed, 

rery subsi a first-class shoe in every 

particular. Steel i 

No, 3c Per Pair, $5.00. 
AMATEUR SPEl AL. . . 




Made of good quali 
Plates riveted to hee 
No. 35. 



calfskin, machine sewed. A servlce- 
and one we can specially recommend. 

Per Pair, $3.50. 



COMPLETE CATALOCUE OF ALL SPORTS FREE. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

New York and Chicago. 



- 



THE Christy Saddle 

CI I E hygienic features of the Christy 
Saddle have been universally re- 
cognized and confirmed by testi- 
monials from il sands of physicians 

in the United States and Canada, who 
use it themselves and prescribe it for 
their patients. 

It is modeled on anatomical lines 
and comfortable cushions are SO placed 
as to receive the bony prominences of 
the pi Ivis, sustaining the weight of the 
body, and the open centre protecting 
ptible to injury. 
Made in various sizes suitable for 
children, as follow s: 

MEN'S MODEL 

I m ith pommel) 

No. 1. Medium m/^-, width,8% in 

La '■ size, width, !i in 
No. 1. Small size, width ', ' in 



1898 
MODELS 




: ■ 

THE ' i ■ 

men, women ami 



WOMEN'S HODEL 
, without pon 

S. Small size, width. 7 ' .■ 
0. I ,,ti ge H/--. u'uiili, !) 



Insist upon having the Christy— the original and genuine 
anatomical saddle. 




Shepard Bevel= 
Gear Cyclometer 



It measures yards and i' 
no other cyclometer doi . 

It has no springs — just a 
gears which interlock ; tin 
jolting has no effect upon it. 

Every revolution oi the wheel 
is accurately registered in feet, 
yards, tenths "f a mile, mill s, 
hundreds, thousands ami ten 
of thousands. 

It is the smallest i 
made. Weighs only l' 4 ' ounces, fsdusl proof and rust proof. 



Price 



New >ork. 



A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. 



Chicago. 







No. 0. 



Spalding's Inflated Body Protector. 

W._- nre now the sole manufacturers of the Gray Patent 
tors, the only practical device for the protection 
oi catchers and umpires. They are made 

il ii air, light and pliable, an- 1 do not in- 
terfere with the movement ■ < f the wearer under an | 
ditlons. When not in use the air may be Let out and the 
Protector rolled in a very small space. We have added 

this sea Itich is equal 

in quality to the other styles, only smaller in 

Each. 

No. O. League Catchers' Protector $ | O.OO 

No- |. Amateur Catchers' Protector 6.00 

No. 2. Boys' Catchers' Protector 5.00 

Spalding's 

Special League Shoe Plates. 

Patented. 

Our Special League Plates are made of the finest tern- 

and the strength increased almost fourfold 

without increasing m ■ brace, 

which i ■ metal 

^■pressing the centre, thus forming a 

side. 

No, O. Spalding's Special Hand Forged Steel Pair. 

Toe Plates $ .50 

No. 2~0« Spalding's Special Hand Forged Steel 

Heel PJates 50 

Per dozen pairs, $5.00 

Professional Shoe Plates. 




No. 0. 



No, |. Spalding's Professional Toe Plates, best 

quality steel 

No< | H. Spalding's Professional Heel 

best quality steel 

Per dozen pairs, $2-50 



No. 2. 

Steel. 



Amateur Shoe Plates. 

Spalding's Amateur Shoe Plates, fine 



RUNS 

o.„,et,«.. 



= LW» 



Spalding's Umpire Indicator. 

No. O. Made of celluloid, ex* ■ 
inches. 1 1 I i ally of 
balls and strikes. Endorsed and used hy 
all League umpires Each, 

Spalding's Scoring Tablet. 

No I, A simple, convenient and accurate 
device for the record of runs and outs. 
It is made of celluloid and can be easily 
carried in any vest pocket Each, 



.25 



.25 



.10 



.50 



new york A. G. SPALDING & BROS. Chicago 





Base Ball Caps. 

Chicago, College, Boston and University styles. 

Each. 

No. O quality, best flannel $ | .OO 

No. | quality, lighter flannel .85 

No, 2 quality, good flannel. 75 

No. 3 quality, ordinary flannel .50 

Chicago Style. No " 4 *Mlfey*H*nt flannel .40 

Chicago Style, made in 0, 1st, 2d and 8d 
qualities. 

College Style, made In all qualities. 
^^ Boston Style, made in 0, 1st, 2d and 3d 
qualities. 

^^*^ University Style, made in and 1st qualities 

Boston Style. only. 

Base Ball Belts. 

Worsted Web Belts. 

No. 3"0. Special League Belt, Worsted 
Web, 2^4 inches wide, leather lined, 

No. 3/0. nickel plated buckle Each, 75c. 

No. 2-0. League Belt, Worsted W 

inches wide, large nickel-plated buckle, 
Each, 50c. 
No. 2. Worsted Web Bclt.S's in<h 
double strap, leather covered buckles, 

No. 2. 50C. 

No. 47. Worsted Web Belt, 8% inches 

wide, single strap, leather covered buckle, 

50c. 
Cotton Web Belts. 

Colors: Red, Navy, White, Maroon and 
No. 47. Stripes. 

So. 23. Cotton Web Belt, 2'.' inches 

wide, i rp, nickel buckles, 

Kach,25C. 

No. 4. Cotton Web Belt, t}i inches, 
leather mounted, single strap an-t l< 
No. -a. Each - 20c 

Athletes' Uniform Bag. 

For carrying Base Ball and other uniforms. 
Made to roll and will not wrinkle or soil 
same. Separate compartments 1 

No. I. Canvas Each, $2.50 

No. 2- Fine Bag Leather 5 OO 

NtTV vork A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. Chicago 







«wwsw 



Spalding's Base Ball Shirts. 

In I. ace or Button Front. Each. 

No. O. (&jjffl!£!& Shirt, any style $5.50 

No. I. The "University" Shirt, any style 4.50 

No. 2. " Interscholastic" Shirt, any style 3.75 

No. 3. " Clob Special " Shirt, any style 2.50 

No. 4. "Amateur Special " Shirt, any style. .. | .85 
Price includes Lettering on Shirts. 

Spalding's 
Base Ball Pants. 




In Tape or Elastic Bottom. 
All Padded. 



Wo. O. 



Pants. 



Pair. 

$6.00 



Elastic Bottom. 




N". |. " University " Pants 4.50 

N''>. 2. " Interscholastic " Pants 3.50 

No. 3. "Club Special" Pants 2.50 

No. 4. "Amateur Special " Pants 1.75 

Spalding's 
Base Ball Uniforms. 

Complete:. 
Including Shirt, Padded Pants, Cap, Belt and 

nigS. 



No. O. 



Uniform $ I 4.75 



No. |. "University " Uniform | (.25 

No. 2. " Interscholastic " Uniform 9.00 



No. 3« " Club Special " Uniform. 



6.25 



No. 4, "Amateur Special 1 ' Uniform..-, 4.50 

Our line of flannels for Base Hall Uniforms consists of the best quali- 
ties in their respective grades and the most desirable colors for Base Ball 
Uniforms. Each grade is kept up to the highest point of excellence and 
quality improved wherever possible every season. Owing to the heavy 
weight flannels used in our Nos. and 1 Uniforms, we have found it 
desirable, after many y.-.-trs of experience, to use a little lighter weight 
material for the shins; thismakes them more comfortable, much cooler, 
and wear just as well as the heavier weight. 

new york A. Q. SPALDING & BROS. Chicago 



Opalding's Home Library 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY 

Devoted to Games and Pastimes 
of Interest to the Home Circle... 

i Chess 

2 Whist 

3 Dominoes and Dice 
4 Poker 
9 Checkers 5 Backgammon 

io Bezique 6 Euchre 

ii Pool 7 Billiards 

12 Pinochle 8 Ecarte 

13 Loto 
17 Go-Bang 14 Hearts 

iS Games of Patience 15 Reversi 

19 Children's Games 16 Piquet 

20 Cribbage 

21 Drawing Room Games 
22 Group of Card Games 

23 Children's Qames 

24 Group of Card Games 

25 Drawing Room Games 
26 Group of Card Games 

27 Children's Games 

25 Skat 

29 Drawing Room Games 
30 Baccarat 

PRICE 10 CENT5 



American Sports Pub. Co., 



241 BROADWAY, N. Y. 



I. 









SPALDING'S 

Athletic Library 



No. 



Published Monthly 



3, I I; 

4. How ixer. 
6, Gymna 

I'.. How tn Pliy i 

■ 

; Boys. By W 

9- '1 ! v to Run, Sprint, 

Jump, Walk, an- 1 I 
'■ 
13. H 

■ 
10. SI 

I), Phillips. 
-.'' I. Ci 
8 1 . 1 : 
■ 

■ 

■ 
i | M. ( '. Mui 
■ i 

I ..;■'■ 

38. Pr Arthur A. Irwin. 

87. All 

'■'/.* Lawn Bowls, By Hi 

'. 

I,'. i I i 

.;, etc. 

■ 
\ t \ \ \ t roide. 

1 

[W 

n i 

mplincd. N 

orda. 

■ 

Per Copy, 10 cents, postpaid. 

AMERICAN SPORTS PUB. CO., 

211 BROADWAY , V \ 



nil ■ UUP 



Ll